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Present Perfect Tense vs. Past Simple: Tom’s Story (A comical story of Tom, the ESL student - Video)
 
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Follow Tom in his everyday life and teach the present perfect tense by contrasting it with the past simple to pre-intermediate level ESL learners. If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. For the “No Music” version of this video, please click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SnYv8rB32WE&feature=youtu.be Title of English / ESL Video: Tom’s Story Target English Grammar: Present Perfect Tense vs. Past Simple Tense Student Proficiency Level: Pre-intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Present Perfect Tense vs. Past Simple Approximate chronological order: Rules and Explanation: Functions: – Past events – Recent past events – Unfinished states Timeline: Past Events – The present perfect simple tense indicates that something happened in the past. – We don’t know when it happened. We just know it happened in the past some time between the day that you were born until now. Visual Representation of Example: – Example: I’ve been to Australia. – This means some time in the past, you went to Australia. – been vs. gone: Gone means you went there, but you’re still not back yet. Been means you went there, and then you left. – We often use never to emphasize negatives and ever to emphasize questions. – Example: Have you ever been to America? (No, I’ve never been to America.) Recent Past Events: – Example 1: Mum, have you finished cooking dinner? – Example 2: Yes boys, I’ve made your favourite! – We can also use just, yet and already for emphasis. – Example 1: Mum, have you finished cooking dinner yet? – Example 2: Yes boys, I’ve just made your favourite! Unfinished States: – Example: We’ve known each other for two weeks now. – We use for for a period of time. – Examples: for an hour, for two days, for the last 10 years. – We use since for a starting point in time. – Examples: since last night, since three months ago, since the 1980s. Timeline: Unfinished States – We’ve known each other for two weeks now. – The boy met the girl at a certain point in the past, and they still know each other in the present. – They have known each other for two weeks, which means they met two weeks ago. Simple Past: Function – To talk about finished events where the time is known. – Example 1: How was your date honey? – Example 2: We broke up… – In these examples, although the time is not mentioned, both the boy and his mother know the time of the date. – We can use just for emphasis that an event recently happened. – Example: We just broke up. Form: Statements: Subject + have/has (+ never/just/already) + past participle + … (+ for/since, time word, yet) I + ‘ve + been + to Australia. I + ‘ve + never + been + to America. I + haven’t + made + dinner + yet. We + ‘ve + known + each other + for two weeks now. Open Questions: Wh-/How + have/has + subject + past participle + … (+ for) + ? How long + have + we + known + each other + for? *Wh-/how question words and for are for open questions. Yes/No Questions: Have/has + subject (+ ever) + past participle + … (+ yet, time word) + ? Have + you + ever + been + to Australia? Have + you + finished + cooking + dinner + yet? *Ever, yet and time words are for yes/no questions. Summary
Views: 667853 oomongzu
Past Simple Tense be - was / were: Fun & Interactive English Grammar ESL Video
 
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Teach your beginner students the past simple tense be: was/were with this original & innovative video and introduce your learners to timelines. If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching ESL videos, please visit our website. For the “No Music” version of this ESL video, please click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9TYJn8v9dr8 Title of English / ESL Video: Past Simple Tense be: was/were Target English Grammar: Past simple tense be: was/were Student Proficiency Level: Beginner level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Past Simple Tense be – was/were Approximate chronological order: Rules and Explanation: Elicitation of positive example sentence: He was short. Elicitation of negative example sentence: He wasn’t short. *Pause the video after the question to give students time to answer. Meaning / Function (Definition): We use the simple past to talk about the past. Affirmative and Negative Sentences: wasn’t = was not (contraction) Positive and Negative Examples: – Positive example sentence: I was a police officer. Negative example question: I wasn’t a police officer. – Positive example sentence: She was beautiful. Negative example question: She wasn’t beautiful. – Positive example sentence: It was expensive! Negative example question: It wasn’t expensive! – Positive example sentence: We were at home. Negative example question: We weren’t at home. – Positive example sentence: They were in Russia. Negative example question: They weren’t in Thailand Form / Structure: Singular vs. Plural: The simple past of “be” has two forms: was and were. Elicit from students: Which one is singular and which one is plural? (Was is singular and were is plural.) But sometimes English doesn’t always follow the rules. The pronoun you can be singular or plural, but we use were for both singular you and plural you. – Positive example sentence: You were late to school. Negative example question: You weren’t late to school. Wh- Question: – Example question: Why were you late to school? Yes/No Question Form: – Example question: Were you late to school? The short answer for a yes/no question is: Yes, I was. No, I wasn’t. Further Example Wh- Questions and Yes/No Questions: When were they in Russia? Were they in Russia? The short answers are: Yes, they were. No, they weren’t. How much was it? Was it expensive? (Elicit) And what are the short answers? Yes, it was. No, it wasn’t. Summary: The negatives are: was = wasn’t were = weren’t was is singular. were is plural and for you. The short answers to yes/no questions are: Yes, + subject + was/were. No, + subject + wasn’t/weren’t.
Views: 213733 oomongzu
Future Simple Tense - Will Won’t: Creative ESL Whiteboard Animation Video (Fun for the whole class!)
 
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Use this creative ESL whiteboard animation video to teach future simple tense (will / won’t) to pre-intermediate learners in a fun & engaging manner! If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. For the “No Music” version of this video, please go here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNtCCC7PcE8 Title of English / ESL Video: Whiteboard Animation Target English Grammar: Future simple tense (will / won’t) Also known as: the simple future. *"be going to" is not explained in this video. Student Proficiency Level: Pre-intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Future Simple Tense – Will / Won’t Approximate chronological order: Functions and Uses: – Promises: I will love you forever. – Offers: I‘ll help you eat it! – Spontaneous or quick decisions: I‘ll get help… – Spontaneous threats: I‘ll make you sorry! – Predictions about the future: In the future… you will die! Form: Positive: will Contractions: I’ll, you’ll, we’ll… Negative: will not Contraction: won’t – Use contractions when speaking. Summary of Functions and Uses Other Important Information: "will" and "won’t" vs. "be going to" The simple future tense comes in two variations: - "Will" and "won’t" - "be going to" These two variations can have different meanings and cannot always be used interchangeably. be going to is used for talking about future plans and also for making predictions. While will and won’t can also be used to make predictions, we do not use them to talk about future plans. Hence, only in the case of making predictions, may we use will and won’t and be going to interchangeably. Take for example: Speaker A: Can you wash the car today? Speaker B: I’ll do it tomorrow. Speaker B did not plan on washing the car tomorrow. Rather, it was a spontaneous decision caused by speaker A’s request. Had speaker B said I’m going to do it tomorrow, it would suggest that speaker B already planned on washing the car tomorrow prior to speaker A asking. This video only focuses on will and won’t. We will explore be going to in other videos.
Views: 76108 oomongzu
Gerunds and Infinitives (Verbs): Fun & humorous ESL video to peak your students’ engagement!
 
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This creative & engaging animated ESL video teaches learners about gerunds and infinitives (verbs) at the upper-intermediate level. Use this in class and have a blast! If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. For the “No Music” version of this video, please go here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W5OosgcMhRs Title of English / ESL Video: Gerunds and Infinitives (Verbs) Target English Grammar: Gerunds and Infinitives (Verbs): – Gerund verbs. – Infinitives with “to”. – Infinitives without “to”. Student Proficiency Level: Upper-intermediate level grammar. Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Gerunds and Infinitives (Verbs) Approximate chronological order: Gerunds: – Elicitation of target grammar. Form: – Verb + ing Function: – Gerunds act as nouns or pronouns. Specific Uses: – Likes/dislikes: I love shopping. – General activities: I’m good at dancing. – Abstract ideas: I’m not used to working late. – When there is no noun to describe something: Catching the train during peak hour is really annoying. – When speaking or writing in incomplete sentences: What are your hobbies? Watching TV and surfing the Internet. Use Gerunds: – As the subject of a sentence: Flying makes me nervous. – As the object of a sentence: I find listening to music very relaxing. – After prepositions: The police arrested her for speeding. – After phrasal verbs: She ended up going to prison. – After some verbs including: admit, avoid, can’t help, carry on, consider, deny, finish, give up, imagine, involve, keep on, miss, postpone, practice, risk, spend, stop, suggest. – Example: You should avoid taking a stroll outside during a hurricane. – After words for expressing like/dislike: can’t stand, crazy about, enjoy, fancy, hate, like/dislike, keen on, love, don’t mind, prefer. – Example: I love skydiving. Use Infinitives (with “to”): – To express a reason or purpose: He ran to avoid being caught. – After adjectives: This safe is easy to break open. – After some verbs, including: can/can’t afford, agree, appear, be able to, can’t wait, decide, expect, forget, happen, have (got), help, hope, learn, manage, need, offer, plan, pretend, promise, refuse, remember, seem, teach, tend, threaten, try, want, would like. – Example: He threatened to hurt the man. *Infinitives are not generally used as the subject of sentences. Use the Infinitive (without “to”) after: – Modal verbs: You should see a doctor. – Auxiliary verbs: We‘ll go swimming tomorrow. – let, make and help. – Example 1: Let‘s go shopping. – Example 2: Help me carry my shoes. – Example 3: Sometimes she makes me want to scream! Negative Forms: Target language form the negative with “not”: – Gerunds: I don’t like shopping. – Infinitives (with “to”): I don’t want to go shopping. – Infinitives (without “to”): I won’t go shopping. These verbs can be followed with either the gerund or infinitive (with “to”) with no difference in meaning: – begin, continue, prefer, start. For example: – I prefer doing yoga. – I prefer to do yoga. These verbs can be followed with either the gerund or infinitive (with “to”), but the meaning is different: – try, remember, forget, need. – Example 1: – Try not to hurt yourself again. (This means, make an effort to do something.) – You should try going to an Italian restaurant. (This means, try something to see if you like it.) – Example 2: – Remember to fasten your seatbelt. (This means, don’t forget something.) – I remember seeing you in high school. (This means, having a memory of something.) – Example 3: – I forgot to bring my luggage. (This means, you didn’t remember something.) – I’ll never forget seeing the beautiful scenery. (This means, you did something and you won’t forget it. It’s more common in the negative form.) – Example 4: – You need to buy a new car. (This means, you must do something.) – That car needs repairing. (This means, the subject needs something.)
Views: 117386 oomongzu
Zero Conditional - Conditional Sentences: Creative & engaging animated ESL video for teachers to use
 
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Teach your students zero conditionals (conditional sentences) using this exciting, fun & interactive animated ESL video for upper-intermediate learners. If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. For the “No Music” version of this video, please click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-gpvf2_Mrpg Title of English / ESL Video: Zero Conditionals Target English Grammar: Zero Conditionals: – Conditional sentences / conditional clauses – If clause + result clause / clauses of result – Also known as: – condition clause + consequence clause – subordinate clause + main clause / other clause – dependent clause + independent clause. Student Proficiency Level: Upper-intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Zero Conditionals – Conditional Sentences Approximate chronological order: Rules and Explanation: Function: – To talk about things which are always true or things which always happen as a result of something else. We’re not talking about a specific event, but rather something which is generally true. Specific Uses: – Elicitation from students. – Facts: If I mix hydrogen with oxygen, it turns into water. – Elicitation from students. – General truths: If you fly with budget airlines, the drinks are expensive. – Routines and habits: Unless I’m late for work, I always catch the train. – Preferences: When I stir fry vegetables, I prefer olive oil. – Rules and laws: If you’re in class, don’t use your phone. – Cause and effects: If you eat too much junk food, you can get fat. – Superstitions: It’s bad luck if the groom sees the bride before the wedding. – Proverbs: When it rains, it pours! – 0 conditionals can also be used for specific situations: – To give instructions: If Bill comes here again, tell him I’m not scared of him! – To offer suggestions and advice: If you go to the beach, put on lots of sunscreen. – To make requests: If you go past the groceries store, get a few things for me please. Concept Checking Questions (CCQs) – 0 conditionals don’t talk about the past, present or future. They talk about things which are always true. Form: Statements: – If + present simple, + present simple – If + I mix hydrogen with water, + it turns into water. When / Unless: – We can use when or unless to replace if in the if clause. – Example 1: When + I stir fry vegetables, I + prefer olive oil. – Example 2: Unless + I’m late for work, + I always catch the train. Modal Verbs: – Modal verbs are common in 0 conditionals and can be used in either the if the clause or the result clause. – Example: If + you eat too much junk food, + you can get fat. Imperatives: – Imperatives are common in the result clause when we: – describe rules and laws: If you’re in class, don’t use your phone. – give instructions: If Bill comes here again, tell him I’m not scared of him! – offer suggestions and advice: If you go to the beach, put on lots of sunscreen. – make requests: If you go past the groceries store, get a few things for me please. Present Continuous / Present Progressive Tense: – Instead of using the present simple tense, we can use the present continuous / present progressive tense in either of the clauses. – Example 1: If you go past the groceries store, get a few things for me please. – Example 1: If you‘re going out, get a few things for me please. (Present continuous + present simple) – Example 2: If you eat too much junk food, you can get fat. – Example 2: If you’re overweight, you‘re probably eating too much junk food. (Present simple + present continuous) Present Perfect Simple Tense: – We can also use the present perfect simple tense in either clause. – Example 1: Unless I’m late for work, I always catch the train. – Example 1: If you‘ve caught the train during peak hour, you know how packed the trains are. (Present perfect + present simple) – Example 2: If you go to the beach, put on lots of sunscreen. – Example 2: If you‘ve been to the beach, you‘ve probably been sunburned before. (Present perfect + present perfect) Summary of Functions: – To talk about things which are always true or things which happen as a result of something: – Facts. – General truths. – Routines. – Habits. – Preferences. – Rules and laws. – Cause and effects. – Superstitions. – Proverbs. – Specific situations: – Instructions. – Suggestions and advice. – Requests.
Views: 57501 oomongzu
Second Conditional If Clause: Fun, interactive & humorous ESL video to engage your students!
 
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Teach learners about second conditionals (conditional sentences) using this creative & engaging animated ESL video for intermediate level classrooms. If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. For the “No Music” version of this video, please click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qP-ROqRJ_X4 Title of English / ESL Video: Second Conditionals Target English Grammar: 2nd Conditionals: – Conditional sentences / conditional clauses – If clause + result clause / clauses of result – Also known as: – condition clause + consequence clause – subordinate clause + main clause / other clause – dependent clause + independent clause. Student Proficiency Level: Intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Second Conditionals – Conditional Sentences Approximate chronological order: Rules and Explanations: – Elicitation of target language. Function: – To talk about hypothetical or imaginary situations in the present or future and their consequences. Specific Uses: – Elicitation of target language. – To express desires: If I were rich, I’d buy a big house. – In 2nd conditionals, we use were after any pronoun in the if clause. – Using was in informal language is still perfectly fine. – To give advice: If I were you, I’d buy a new phone. – For short we can just say the result clause: I’d buy a new phone. Could: – could = would be able to – Example: If I spoke Greek, I could ask Sophia out. If only…: – We use If only… to say that we want things to be different. – It has a similar meaning to I wish…, but with a stronger emotion. – Example 1: If only I were rich, I’d buy a big house! – Example 2: If only I spoke Greek, I’d ask Sophia out! – We often say this without the result clause. – Example 1: If only I were rich! – Example 2: If only I spoke Greek! – We don’t use If only… for giving advice. We only use it to express desires. Concept Checking Questions (CCQs) Form: – If clause, + result clause – If/Unless + past simple, + would + verb (base form) – If + I ate everything, + I’d + get fat. – If + I were you, + I’d + buy a new phone. Switching Clause Positions: – Result clause + if clause – I’d get fat + if I ate everything. – I’d buy a new phone + if I were you. Summary of Functions and Uses: – To talk about hypothetical or imaginary situations in the present or the future and their consequences. – To express desires. – To give advice.
Views: 53658 oomongzu
Past Simple Tense - Regular Verbs: The Story of Alice and Josh (No Music)
 
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This is the "No Music" version. For the version with background music, please click here: http://oomongzu.com/beginner/past-simple-tense-regular-verbs/ If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu Teach students the past simple tense - regular verbs using this cute, but unfortunate love story of Alice and Josh. (Beginner / Starter Level) WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. Title of English / ESL Video: The Story of Alice and Josh Target English Grammar: Past Simple Tense – Regular Verbs (Also known as the Simple Past). Student Proficiency Level: Beginner / starter level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Past Simple Tense – Regular Verbs Approximate chronological order: Story: – Starts: 0:24 – Ends: 1:48 Rules and Explanation: – Starts: 1:49 – Ends: 4:36 Grammar Explanation – How do we change regular verbs into the simple past? Elicitation: *Pause the video after the question to give students time to answer. Josh asked Alice to dinner. What is the base verb of asked? (ask) For most regular verbs we add +ed at the end of the base verb to change it into the simple past. – Alice liked shopping. What is the base verb of liked? (like) For verbs ending with an -e we add +d. – Josh married someone else. For verbs ending with a consonant and +y we remove the -y and add +ied. – They stayed at a romantic hotel. For verbs ending with a vowel and +y we don’t remove the y. We just add +ed. – Alice and Josh travelled to Italy. For verbs ending with consonant, vowel and consonant we double the last consonant and add +ed. In American English travelled is spelled with one l. So American English doesn’t always follow his rule. These verbs are what we call regular verbs. They follow a rule to change into the simple past.
Views: 7151 oomongzu
First Conditional - Conditional Sentences: I want to watch Pokemon! (A lighthearted ESL video story)
 
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Teach first conditional (conditional sentences) with this lighthearted video about a day in the life of a girl & her father, set for pre-intermediate level classes. If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. For the “No Music” version of this video, please go here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iTn2mTu4cDE Title of English / ESL Video: I want to watch Pokemon! Target English Grammar: First Conditional: – Conditional sentences / conditional clauses – If clause + result clause / clauses of result – Also known as: – condition clause + consequence clause – subordinate clause + main clause / other clause – dependent clause + independent clause. Student Proficiency Level: Pre-intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: First Conditional – Conditional Sentences Approximate chronological order: 1st Conditional: – Elicitation of target grammar. Functions: – We use the 1st conditional to talk about a possible event or situation, in the present or the future, and its result or consequence. Uses: – Possibilities and uncertain events and situations with results and consequences. – Example 1: If I miss the bus, I’ll catch a taxi. – Example 2: If we miss the bus again, I’ll be late for my favourite show! – Future plans and invitations: If the weather’s good tomorrow, we’ll go to the park. – Offers and promises: If I finish my work, I’ll watch Pokemon with you. – Negotiations: If you help me make dinner, I’ll help you with your homework. – Threats and warnings: If you keep acting like this, you’ll be grounded for a week! – Polite requests: If you’ll give me a moment, I’ll be right there sweetie! 1st Conditional Forms: Statements: – If clause, + result clause – Also known as, condition clause + consequence clause, or subordinate clause + main clause / other clause. – If + any present tense, + any future tense. – Most common form: If + present simple, + future simple (with “will”) – Example: If + I miss the bus, + I’ll catch a taxi. Using “Unless”: – We can also replace “if” with “unless” in the if clause. – Example: Unless I miss the bus, I won’t catch a taxi. Switching the Positions of the Clauses: – Result clause + if clause – I’ll catch a taxi if I miss the bus. – No comma when the result clause comes first. Yes/No Questions: – If + present simple, + will + subject + verb (base form) – Elicitation from students. – Example: If + you miss the bus, + will + you + catch a taxi? – Short Answers: – Yes, I will. – No, I won’t. – Elicitation from students. Open Questions: – If + present simple, + wh-/how + will + subject + verb (base form) – Example: If + you miss the bus, + how + will + you + get home? – Elicitation from students. Summary of Functions and Uses Concept checking questions (CCQs)
Views: 48375 oomongzu
Past Simple Tense - Regular & Irregular Verbs: Life of Miss Johnson (Comical Fun ESL Grammar Video)
 
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Follow the comical love life of Miss Johnson and give students a revision on the past simple tense with regular and irregular verbs. If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu Teachers may also use this story to teach learners vocabulary for relationships and marital statuses. Click the link to watch the vocabulary: relationships and marital statuses video: http://oomongzu.com/pre-intermediate/relationships-marital-statuses/ WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. For the “No Music” version of this video, please click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEEAo7W3Yzg&feature=youtu.be Title of English / ESL Video: The Life of Miss Johnson Target English Grammar: Past Simple Tense (also known as the simple past tense) – regular verbs, irregular verbs, past simple be – was/were. Student Proficiency Level: Pre-Intermediate level Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Past Simple Tense – Regular and Irregular Verbs and Was/Were Approximate chronological order: Story: – Starts: 0:00 – Ends: 2:16 Grammar Rules and Explanation: – Starts: 2:16 – Ends: 8:17 Regular Verbs: For most regular verbs, we add +ed. Example: walk – walked Example sentence: Miss Johnson walked to the park for a stroll. Verbs ending with -e: For verbs ending with -e, we add +d. Example: die – died Example sentence: She was hit by a truck and died. NOTE: die, died - verbs dead - adjective Verbs ending with consonant + y: For verbs ending with consonant + y, we delete -y, and add +ied. Example: marry – married Example sentence: Miss Moore married Dave. NOTE: Married in this sentence is a verb. They fell in love and got married. Married in this sentence, however, is not a verb. It’s actually an adjective. Got is the main verb. Verbs ending vowel + y: For verbs ending with vowel + y, we don’t delete -y, we just add +ed. Example: stay – stayed Example sentence: They stayed at a romantic 1 star hotel. Verbs ending with vowel, consonant and vowel: For verbs ending with vowel, consonant and vowel, we double the consonant and add +ed. Example: travel – travelled Example sentence: They travelled overseas. NOTE: In American English, the past simple tense of travel is traveled, spelt with one l. So American English often doesn’t follow this rule. Even in other types of English, this rule isn’t always followed. Example: visit – visited. Example sentence: They visited many beautiful places. Irregular Verbs: For irregular verbs, there are no rules, so we just have to remember them all. Examples: go – went meet – met fall – fell have – had break – broke see – saw get – got give – gave Example sentence: One day, Miss Johnson went shopping at the supermarket and met Mr. Smith. Past Simple – be: was/were am – was is – was are – were Example sentence: Miss Johnson was on the bus. Grammar Form / Structure: Affirmative and Negative Sentence Form: To change positive past simple tense sentences into the negative, we add didn’t in front of the main verb and change the main verb into the base form. Did is the past tense of do. We don’t put two past simple verbs in the same past simple clause, so this is why we need to change the main verb into the base form. Example: went – didn’t go NOT: didn’t went Example sentence: Miss Johnson went shopping at the supermarket. Miss Johnson didn’t go shopping at the supermarket. Affirmative and Negative Sentence Form: Past Simple be – was/were was – wasn’t were – weren’t Wasn’t is the contraction of was not. Weren’t is the contraction of were not. Example sentence: Mr. Jones was very sad. Mr. Jones wasn’t very sad.
Views: 48123 oomongzu
Past Simple Tense be: was / were (No Music)
 
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This is the "No Music" version. For the version with background music, please click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O3FdGPehN-E If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu Teach your beginner students the past simple tense be: was/were with this original & innovative video and introduce your learners to timelines. WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. Title of English / ESL Video: Past Simple Tense be: was/were Target English Grammar: Past simple tense be: was/were Student Proficiency Level: Beginner level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Past Simple Tense be – was/were Approximate chronological order: Rules and Explanation: Elicitation of positive example sentence: He was short. Elicitation of negative example sentence: He wasn’t short. *Pause the video after the question to give students time to answer. Meaning / Function (Definition): We use the simple past to talk about the past. Affirmative and Negative Sentences: wasn’t = was not (contraction) Positive and Negative Examples: – Positive example sentence: I was a police officer. Negative example question: I wasn’t a police officer. – Positive example sentence: She was beautiful. Negative example question: She wasn’t beautiful. – Positive example sentence: It was expensive! Negative example question: It wasn’t expensive! – Positive example sentence: We were at home. Negative example question: We weren’t at home. – Positive example sentence: They were in Russia. Negative example question: They weren’t in Thailand Form / Structure: Singular vs. Plural: The simple past of “be” has two forms: was and were. Elicit from students: Which one is singular and which one is plural? (Was is singular and were is plural.) But sometimes English doesn’t always follow the rules. The pronoun you can be singular or plural, but we use were for both singular you and plural you. – Positive example sentence: You were late to school. Negative example question: You weren’t late to school. Wh- Question: – Example question: Why were you late to school? Yes/No Question Form: – Example question: Were you late to school? The short answer for a yes/no question is: Yes, I was. No, I wasn’t. Further Example Wh- Questions and Yes/No Questions: When were they in Russia? Were they in Russia? The short answers are: Yes, they were. No, they weren’t. How much was it? Was it expensive? (Elicit) And what are the short answers? Yes, it was. No, it wasn’t. Summary: The negatives are: was = wasn’t were = weren’t was is singular. were is plural and for you. The short answers to yes/no questions are: Yes, + subject + was/were. No, + subject + wasn’t/weren’t.
Views: 3390 oomongzu
Third Conditional If Clause: Unlucky in Love (Comical Love Story - ESL Video) (Mixed conditionals)
 
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Follow the story of an unlucky couple who just can’t seem to catch a break! Teach third conditionals if clause & mixed conditionals to intermediate level students. If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. For the “No Music” version of this video, please click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RAferLeJJHw Title of English / ESL Video: Unlucky in Love Target English Grammar: Third Conditionals: – Mixed Conditionals – Conditional clauses / conditional sentences – If clause + result clause / clauses of result – Also known as: – condition clause + consequence clause – subordinate clause + main clause / other clause – dependent clause + independent clause. Student Proficiency Level: Intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Third Conditionals If Clause & Mixed Conditionals Approximate chronological order: Rules and Explanations: Elicitation of example sentence: If I had won the lottery, I would have gone on a shopping spree. Function: – To talk about a hypothetical situation in the past which didn’t happen and its consequence. Specific Uses: – To criticize: If you hadn’t been so careless, you wouldn’t have had that accident. – Using If only… to criticize: (Elicitation from students) If only you hadn’t been so careless. – To express regret: If I’d known it was winter in America right now, I would’ve packed warm clothes. – Using If only… to express regret: If only I’d known it was winter in America right now! Could and Might: – Use could or might instead of would if you are less sure about the consequence. – Example: If I’d finished high school, I might‘ve got into university. Concept Checking Questions (CCQs) Form: Statements: – If clause, + result/consequence clause (main clause/other clause) – If + past perfect, + would + have + past participle – If + I had won the lottery, + I would + have + gone on a shopping spree. Contractions: – If I’d won the lottery, I would’ve gone on a shopping spree. – If I’d won the lottery, I’d have gone on a shopping spree. Switch Clause Positions: – Result clause + condition clause – I would’ve gone on a shopping spree if I’d won the lottery. *Notice that there is no comma when the clause positions are switched. Yes/No Questions: – Elicitation from students. – Condition clause, + would + subject + have + past participle – If you’d won the lottery, + would + you + have + gone on a shopping spree? – Answers: – Yes, I would’ve. (Yes, I would. – is also fine.) – No, I wouldn’t have. (No, I wouldn’t. – is also fine.) – Switch clause positions: Elicitation from students. – Would + subject + have + past participle + condition clause – Would + you + have + gone on a shopping spree + if you’d won the lottery? Open Questions: – Elicitation from students. – Condition clause, + wh-/how + would + subject + have + past participle – If you’d won the lottery, + what + would + you + have + done? – Switch clause positions: Elicitation from students. – Wh-/how + would + subject + have + past participle + condition clause – What + would + you + have + done + if you’d won the lottery? Past Perfect Continuous:- We can also use the past perfect continuous in the condition clause. – Example: If you‘d been watching where you were going, you would’ve seen my car. Present Perfect Continuous: – We can also use the present perfect continuous in the result clause. – Example: If you’d told me that you weren’t coming, I wouldn’t have been standing in the raining waiting for you! Mixed Conditionals: 2nd and 3rd If a hypothetical situation in the past has a present or future consequence: – 3rd conditional (past) + 2nd conditional (present/future) – If you’d packed some warm clothes, we wouldn’t be freezing to death right now. If a hypothetical situation which is always true and could have changed the past: – 2nd conditional (always true) + 3rd conditional (past) – If you weren’t so demanding, we could’ve just stayed at home. Summary of Functions and Uses
Views: 25425 oomongzu
Past Continuous Tense vs. Past Simple: The Mysterious Stalker (Suspense Thriller Short - ESL Video)
 
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Watch the suspense thriller short about Elissa and the mysterious stalker & present the past continuous tense vs. past simple to students in a pre-intermediate level lesson. If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. For the “No Music” version of this video, please click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hS6FNg0VoJw Title of English / ESL Video: Elissa and the Mysterious Stalker Target English Grammar: Past Continuous Tense vs. Past Simple Tense. (Also known as Past Progressive Tense and Simple Past Tense) Student Proficiency Level: Pre-intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English. Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Past Continuous Tense vs. Past Simple Approximate chronological order: Storyline: – Starts at 0:00. Ends at 2:40. English Grammar Rules and Explanations: Function: – To talk about an action still in progress in the past. Timeline: – Someone was chasing her. – Someone started chasing her in the past, but we don’t know when. – That person stopped chasing her some time in the past. Again, we don’t know when. – We are talking about the whole period from the beginning of the chase to the end. Specific Uses: – Background event: – On a cold dark night, Elissa was working late at the office. – This sentence sets the setting and the background of the story. Simple Past: – To talk about completed or repeated actions. – She quickly ran into the cemetery. – This action is finished and completed. – When we use two simple past actions, the second action happened after the first action. For example, – She quickly ran into the cemetery and hid there. – So she ran into the cemetery first, then she hid inside the cemetery. Combining the Past Progressive Tense with the Simple Past: – Past progressive = longer action – Past simple = shorter action – The shorter action happened while the longer action was still in progress. But sometimes these two actions happen at the same time. – Example: As she was leaving her office, she realised the streets were now empty. – Elissa leaving her office is the longer action. – Elissa realising the streets were empty is the shorter action. – So Elissa was leaving her office and during this time, she noticed the streets were now empty. But she didn’t stop leaving the office when she noticed this. Specific Uses: – Interruption: Sometimes a shorter action interrupted a longer action. – Example: While she was walking back home, she heard some footsteps behind her. She turned around to look. – Elissa walking back home is the longer action. – Hearing the footsteps is the shorter action. – In this case, the footsteps interrupted her walking and made her stop to look back before she continued walking again. Multiple Progressive Actions in the Same Sentence: – Multiple actions happening at the same time. – Example: I was walking home and someone was following me. – We don’t know which action started first. – We also don’t know which action finished first. – We only know that during a certain period in the past these two actions were happening at the same time. – We can use more than two past progressive actions in the same sentence, and all these actions were happening at the same time some time in the past. Form: Statements: Subject + was/were + verb (-ing) + … Elissa + was + working + late. Yes/No Questions: Was/were + subject + verb (-ing) + …? Was + Elissa + working + late? Open Questions: Wh-/How + was/were + subject + verb (-ing) + …? Why + was + Elissa + working + late? Conjunctions: – We use conjunctions to join past simple and progressive actions. – Example conjunctions: while, when, as. – Example sentence 1: While she was walking back home, she heard some footsteps behind her. – Example sentence 2: When Elissa was hiding, the footsteps stopped. – Example sentence 3: As she was running, she saw a cemetery. Switching the Order of the Tenses: – We can also place the simple past action at the front of the sentence before the past continuous action. – Example: She heard some footsteps behind her while she was walking back home. Concept Checking Questions (CCQs)
Views: 210008 oomongzu
Used to (Grammar): David’s Secret Past (Unravel David’s past find hidden Easter eggs - ESL Video)
 
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Discover David’s secret past and teach pre-intermediate level learners used to (grammar) & “didn’t use to” using this ESL video story. If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. For the “No Music” version of this video, please click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2O0_ZzHCbE Title of English / ESL Video: David’s Secret Past Target English Grammar: Used to (grammar) with “didn’t use to” and past simple. Student Proficiency Level: Pre-intermediate level Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Used to (Grammar) Approximate chronological order: Rules and Explanation: – Elicitation of example sentence. Function: – To talk about things that happen repeatedly or regularly or over a long period of time in the past, but are usually not true now. – We can also use the past simple instead. Example: – I played football every weekend. – I used to play football every weekend. Specific Uses: – Past habits: I used to eat healthy. – Past states: I used to be strong. – Preferences, feelings, thoughts, ideas, etc.: I used to like this girl at work. – We use didn’t use to to talk about things that are true now, but weren’t true before. – Example: I didn’t use to smoke. Actions that only happened once: – We don’t use used to for actions that only happened once. Instead, we use the past simple. – Example: I went to Egypt last year. (Past simple – This is correct.) – Example: I used to go to Egypt last year. (Used to – This is incorrect.) Timeline: – Used to / didn’t use to talks about something that happened regularly in the past. – It started at an unknown time in the past and stopped happening at an unknown time in the past. Form: Statements: – Subject + used to / didn’t use to + verb (base form) + … – I + used to + play + football every weekend. – We can use both action and non-action verbs with used to. – Action verbs: play, eat, smoke, went, etc. – Non-action verbs: be, like, have, afraid, etc. – Used to + not… any more / any longer (present simple) – We use not… any more / any longer to contrast with used to. – Example: I used to play football every weekend, but I don’t any more / any longer. Yes/No Questions: – Did / didn’t + subject + use to + verb (base form) + …? – Did + you + use to + play + football every weekend? Open Questions: – Wh-/how + did / didn’t + subject + use to + verb (base form) + …? – What sport + did + you + use to + play + ? “d”: – Elicitation from students: Why is there a d in used to, but no d in didn’t use to. – Didn’t is already in the past tense, so we don’t change use into the past tense as well. Past Tense vs. Present Tense: – Used to / didn’t use to = past tense – Don’t use used to / didn’t use to for present tense sentences. – Instead use: present simple + usually for present tense sentences. – Example: I usually play football every weekend. Concept Checking Questions (CCQs) Summary of Functions and Uses: – To talk about things that happened repeatedly or regularly or over a long period of time in the past, but are usually not true now. – Repeated actions in the past. – Past habits. – Past states. – Past preferences, feelings, thoughts, ideas, etc.
Views: 21512 oomongzu
If Clause First Conditional: Ricky & Rachel (A Touching Love Story - ESL Video)(Future Time Clauses)
 
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Watch the love story of Ricky & Rachel and teach the if clause - first conditional with future time clauses for intermediate level classrooms. If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. Title of English / ESL Video: Ricky & Rachel Target English Grammar: First Conditional: – Conditional clauses / conditional sentences – If clause + result clause / clauses of result – Also known as: – condition clause + consequence clause – subordinate clause + main clause / other clause – dependent clause + independent clause. – Imperatives – Modal verbs – Should – Future time clauses Student Proficiency Level: Intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the English / ESL video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: If Clause – First Conditional & Future Time Clauses Approximate chronological order: Story of Ricky and Rachel: – Starts at 0:00. Ends at 3:59. Function and Uses – Uncertain events and possibilities: Once I find a job, I’ll pay off this house in no time! – Conditions: Unless we move cities, we could always come back here. – Results and consequences: If you don’t find a new wife, we’ll never have grandchildren. – Future plans and invitations: I’ll show you my secret place after school. – Promises: I’ll love you until death do us part. – Offers: If you’re hurt, I’ll put on some medicine for you. – Negotiations and agreements: If you want to wait, I can wait. – Predictions: You parents will want you to remarry when they find out. – Warnings: If you try to have a baby, you might die. – Threats: If you don’t leave her alone, you’ll be sorry! – Superstitions: If you should cross a black cat, you’ll have bad luck! – Polite requests: If you’ll follow me, I’ll show you my secret forest. – And more… Imperatives: – We can use imperatives instead of “will” in the results clause. – Example: If you love someone, never give up on them. Modal Verbs: We can use modal verbs in either clauses. However, in the result clause, a modal verb would replace “will”. – Example 1: Unless we move cities, we could always come back here. – Example 2: If you want to wait, I can wait. – Example 3: If you try to have a baby, you might die. Should: – “Should” in the condition clause makes the condition less likely. – Example: If you should cross a black cat, you’ll have bad luck! Future Time Clauses: – We can use these instead of “if” in the condition clause. – Example 1: Once I find a job, I’ll pay off this house in no time. – Example 2: I’ll show you my secret place after school. – Example 3: I’ll love you until death do us part. – Example 4: Your parents will want you to remarry when they find out.
Views: 15666 oomongzu
Conditional Sentences Comparison: The Perfect Holiday (Creative ESL Video Story)(Mixed Conditionals)
 
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Follow Lesley on his perfect getaway holiday and compare the various forms of conditional sentences & mixed conditionals to learn their similarities & differences. (Upper-intermediate level) If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. “No Music” version: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bimXyTLko5g Title: The Perfect Holiday Target English Grammar: Conditional Sentences Comparison: First conditional, second conditional, third conditional, zero conditional and mixed conditionals. – Conditional sentences / conditional clauses / if clause – If clause + result clause / clauses of result Also known as: – condition clause + consequence clause – subordinate clause + main clause / other clause – dependent clause + independent clause. Student Level: Upper-intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English and English for Hotel and Tourism. Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. Summary: Conditional Sentences and Mixed Conditionals Elicitation: Zero Conditional – We use the zero conditional to talk about things which are always or generally true, or things which always happen as a result of something else. – Example: If I’m late, my boss gets angry. Elicitation: Second Conditional – We use the second conditional to talk about present or future hypothetical situations and their present or future consequences. – Example: If I were rich, I’d buy a new car. Elicitation: First Conditional – We use the first conditional to talk about possible present or future situations and their future consequences. – Example: If my holiday request gets approved, I’ll go to Thailand. Elicitation: Third Conditional – We use the third conditional to talk about past hypothetical situations and their past consequences. – Example: If I had taken a taxi, I wouldn’t have missed my flight. Elicitation: Mixed Third + Second Conditional – If clause (third conditional about the past) + result clause (second conditional about the present or future) – We use this to talk about past hypothetical situations and their present or future consequences. – Example: If I hadn’t missed my plane, I wouldn’t be in this situation! Elicitation: Mixed Second + Third Conditional – If clause (second conditional about something which is always true) + result clause (third conditional about the past) – We use this to talk about hypothetical situations which are always true and their past consequences. – Example: If I weren’t so careless, I wouldn’t have lost my wallet. Forms: Generic Form: – If clause + result clause, or – Result clause + if clause Zero Conditional – If + any present tense, + any present tense. – Most common form: If + present simple, + present simple. First Conditional – If + any present tense, + any future tense. – Most common form: If + present simple, + future simple (will). Second Conditional – If + past simple / past continuous, + present simple / present continuous (would). – Most common form: If + past simple, + present simple (would). Third Conditional – If + past perfect / past continuous, + present perfect / present continuous (would). – Most common form: If + past perfect, + present perfect (would). Mixed Third & Second Conditional – Third conditional (past) + second conditional (present / future). – If + past perfect / past continuous, + present simple / present continuous (would). Mixed Second & Third Conditional – Second conditional (always true) + third conditional (past) – If + past simple / past continuous, + present perfect / present continuous (would) Other Information: – Using “unless” to replace “if”. – Using future time clauses to replace “if” in first and zero conditionals. – Using imperatives in the result clause. – Using modal verbs in either clause. Imperatives & Modal Verbs - First & Zero Conditionals: – Elicitation from students. – Any first or zero conditional sentence with an imperative or a modal verb in the result clause is both a first and zero conditional sentence. – Example: If you go on holiday, don’t forget your wallet. (Imperative) – Example: If you go on holiday, you should remember to bring your wallet. (Modal verb) – Both these sentences are both first and zero conditionals. Comparison using example sentence: – Zero conditional: If I eat too much, I get sick. – First conditional: If I eat too much, I will get sick. – Second conditional: If I ate too much, I would get sick. – Third conditional: If I had eaten too much, I would have gotten sick. – Mixed third and second conditional: If I had eaten too much, I would be sick right now/later. – Mixed second and third conditional: If I always ate too much, I would have gotten sick a long time ago.
Views: 7786 oomongzu
Past Simple Tense - Regular & Irregular Verbs: Life of Miss Johnson (Comical ESL Video) (No Music)
 
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This is the "No Music" version. For the version with background music, please click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QtAYUaRWnnI&feature=youtu.be If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu Follow the comical love life of Miss Johnson and give students a revision on the past simple tense with regular and irregular verbs. Teachers may also use this story to teach learners vocabulary for relationships and marital statuses. Click the link to watch the vocabulary: relationships and marital statuses video: http://oomongzu.com/pre-intermediate/relationships-marital-statuses/ WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. Title of English / ESL Video: The Life of Miss Johnson Target English Grammar: Past Simple Tense (also known as the simple past tense) – regular verbs, irregular verbs, past simple be – was/were. Student Proficiency Level: Pre-Intermediate level Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Past Simple Tense – Regular and Irregular Verbs and Was/Were Approximate chronological order: Story: – Starts: 0:00 – Ends: 2:16 Grammar Rules and Explanation: – Starts: 2:16 – Ends: 8:17 Regular Verbs: For most regular verbs, we add +ed. Example: walk – walked Example sentence: Miss Johnson walked to the park for a stroll. Verbs ending with -e: For verbs ending with -e, we add +d. Example: die – died Example sentence: She was hit by a truck and died. NOTE: die, died - verbs dead - adjective Verbs ending with consonant + y: For verbs ending with consonant + y, we delete -y, and add +ied. Example: marry – married Example sentence: Miss Moore married Dave. NOTE: Married in this sentence is a verb. They fell in love and got married. Married in this sentence, however, is not a verb. It’s actually an adjective. Got is the main verb. Verbs ending vowel + y: For verbs ending with vowel + y, we don’t delete -y, we just add +ed. Example: stay – stayed Example sentence: They stayed at a romantic 1 star hotel. Verbs ending with vowel, consonant and vowel: For verbs ending with vowel, consonant and vowel, we double the consonant and add +ed. Example: travel – travelled Example sentence: They travelled overseas. NOTE: In American English, the past simple tense of travel is traveled, spelt with one l. So American English often doesn’t follow this rule. Even in other types of English, this rule isn’t always followed. Example: visit – visited. Example sentence: They visited many beautiful places. Irregular Verbs: For irregular verbs, there are no rules, so we just have to remember them all. Examples: go – went meet – met fall – fell have – had break – broke see – saw get – got give – gave Example sentence: One day, Miss Johnson went shopping at the supermarket and met Mr. Smith. Past Simple – be: was/were am – was is – was are – were Example sentence: Miss Johnson was on the bus. Grammar Form / Structure: Affirmative and Negative Sentence Form: To change positive past simple tense sentences into the negative, we add didn’t in front of the main verb and change the main verb into the base form. Did is the past tense of do. We don’t put two past simple verbs in the same past simple clause, so this is why we need to change the main verb into the base form. Example: went – didn’t go NOT: didn’t went Example sentence: Miss Johnson went shopping at the supermarket. Miss Johnson didn’t go shopping at the supermarket. Affirmative and Negative Sentence Form: Past Simple be – was/were was – wasn’t were – weren’t Wasn’t is the contraction of was not. Weren’t is the contraction of were not. Example sentence: Mr. Jones was very sad. Mr. Jones wasn’t very sad.
Views: 4385 oomongzu
Definite Article or Zero Article: World Geography & Landmarks (Interesting & fascinating ESL video)
 
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Compare definite article and zero article (no article) while learning about world geography and discovering famous landmarks. If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. For the “No Music” version of this video, please click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f9ZKEGFpcSo Title of English / ESL Video: World Geography and Landmarks Target Grammar: English Articles – Definite article – Zero article / no article Student Proficiency Level: Upper-intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English and English for Hotel and Tourism. Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Approximate chronological order: We use the for: – oceans, seas, gulfs, reefs and lagoons: This is the border of the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. – rivers and canals: The Amphawa canal is one of the most famous canals in Thailand with its famous floating market. – island groups (multiple islands): The Whitsundays is the largest group of offshore islands in Australia. – mountain ranges (multiple mountains): The Rainbow Mountains in China are multi-coloured as the result of geological formation of the minerals in the rocks. – deserts: The Antarctic Desert is the largest desert in the world. – countries which are republics or unions: The United Kingdom of Great Britain is actually comprised of four countries: England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. – kingdoms, empires and dynasties: During the 13th and 14th centuries, the Mongolian Empire ruled the largest contiguous land empire in history. – places in town such as “the cinema”, “the library” and “the supermarket”: Hanns Scharff was the most successful interrogator in World War 2. Instead of torturing his prisoners, he took them to the cinema on camp and had lunch with them at the cafeteria. – the names of theatres, hotels, galleries, museums and gardens: The Hotel President Wilson in Switzerland is the world’s most expensive hotel. – motorways, highways and number roads: The world’s longest traffic jam lasted 10 days on the China National Highway 110 in 2010. We don’t use articles for: – lakes, ponds, coves, bays and creeks: Lake Hillier is a pink coloured lake. – islands (one island): Koh Tachai is considered to be the most beautiful island in Thailand. Compare with: – It’s located in the Similan Islands. (We use the, because it’s a group of islands.) – mountains (one mountain), peaks and hills: Mount Everest is the highest mountain on Earth and it’s located in the Himalayas. However, the tallest mountain is actually Mauna Kea in Hawaii, USA. – most countries: Saudi Arabia imports sand and camels from Australia. – exceptions for countries: ends with “lands”, “islands” or “isles”. – Example 1: The Netherlands is the second largest beer exporting country in the world. – Example 2: Heineken is from Netherlands and it’s the third largest beer brewing company in the world. (Sometimes not using the is still acceptable.) – short names for countries which are republics or unions: – Example: In 2010, a Nigerian couple living in the UK, gave birth to a blonde white baby with blue eyes. – Or: In 2010, a Nigerian couple living in Britain, gave birth to a blonde white baby with blue eyes. – states, provinces, counties, cities, towns and villages: Yellow is the easiest colour to see from a distance. This is why taxis in New York are yellow. – continents: Africa, Asia and Europe are three separate continents, but they’re actually connected by land. The same goes for North America and South America. – regions ending with the name of a country or continent: – Example 1: Singapore is the most expensive country in South East Asia. – Example 2: The same car would cost you only $20,000 in North America. – the names of cinemas, shops, restaurants, parks and bridges: One of the most amazing parks is Central Park in New York City. – roads, streets and suburbs: Lombard Street is very steep and too dangerous to drive on. Nationalities: – use the definite article or zero article (no article): if the nationality can be changed into plural form: – use the definite article: if the nationality cannot be changed into plural form. – Thais were formerly known as the Siamese. Institutions: – zero article (no article): when we talk about the institution and its normal use: According to the Guinness World Records, the world’s longest incarceration sentence was given to a woman in Thailand. She was sentenced to 141,078 years in prison in 1989. – use articles: when we talk about the building of the institution.
Views: 3954 oomongzu
Zero Conditional - Conditional Sentences (No Music)
 
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This is the "No Music" version. For the version with background music, please click here: http://oomongzu.com/upper-intermediate/zero-conditionals/ If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu Teach your students zero conditionals (conditional sentences) using this exciting, fun & interactive animated ESL video for upper-intermediate learners. WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. Title of English / ESL Video: Zero Conditionals Target English Grammar: Zero Conditionals: – Conditional sentences / conditional clauses – If clause + result clause / clauses of result – Also known as: – condition clause + consequence clause – subordinate clause + main clause / other clause – dependent clause + independent clause. Student Proficiency Level: Upper-intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Zero Conditionals – Conditional Sentences Approximate chronological order: Rules and Explanation: Function: – To talk about things which are always true or things which always happen as a result of something else. We’re not talking about a specific event, but rather something which is generally true. Specific Uses: – Elicitation from students. – Facts: If I mix hydrogen with oxygen, it turns into water. – Elicitation from students. – General truths: If you fly with budget airlines, the drinks are expensive. – Routines and habits: Unless I’m late for work, I always catch the train. – Preferences: When I stir fry vegetables, I prefer olive oil. – Rules and laws: If you’re in class, don’t use your phone. – Cause and effects: If you eat too much junk food, you can get fat. – Superstitions: It’s bad luck if the groom sees the bride before the wedding. – Proverbs: When it rains, it pours! – 0 conditionals can also be used for specific situations: – To give instructions: If Bill comes here again, tell him I’m not scared of him! – To offer suggestions and advice: If you go to the beach, put on lots of sunscreen. – To make requests: If you go past the groceries store, get a few things for me please. Concept Checking Questions (CCQs) – 0 conditionals don’t talk about the past, present or future. They talk about things which are always true. Form: Statements: – If + present simple, + present simple – If + I mix hydrogen with water, + it turns into water. When / Unless: – We can use when or unless to replace if in the if clause. – Example 1: When + I stir fry vegetables, I + prefer olive oil. – Example 2: Unless + I’m late for work, + I always catch the train. Modal Verbs: – Modal verbs are common in 0 conditionals and can be used in either the if the clause or the result clause. – Example: If + you eat too much junk food, + you can get fat. Imperatives: – Imperatives are common in the result clause when we: – describe rules and laws: If you’re in class, don’t use your phone. – give instructions: If Bill comes here again, tell him I’m not scared of him! – offer suggestions and advice: If you go to the beach, put on lots of sunscreen. – make requests: If you go past the groceries store, get a few things for me please. Present Continuous / Present Progressive Tense: – Instead of using the present simple tense, we can use the present continuous / present progressive tense in either of the clauses. – Example 1: If you go past the groceries store, get a few things for me please. – Example 1: If you‘re going out, get a few things for me please. (Present continuous + present simple) – Example 2: If you eat too much junk food, you can get fat. – Example 2: If you’re overweight, you‘re probably eating too much junk food. (Present simple + present continuous) Present Perfect Simple Tense: – We can also use the present perfect simple tense in either clause. – Example 1: Unless I’m late for work, I always catch the train. – Example 1: If you‘ve caught the train during peak hour, you know how packed the trains are. (Present perfect + present simple) – Example 2: If you go to the beach, put on lots of sunscreen. – Example 2: If you‘ve been to the beach, you‘ve probably been sunburned before. (Present perfect + present perfect) Summary of Functions: – To talk about things which are always true or things which happen as a result of something: – Facts. – General truths. – Routines. – Habits. – Preferences. – Rules and laws. – Cause and effects. – Superstitions. – Proverbs. – Specific situations: – Instructions. – Suggestions and advice. – Requests.
Views: 1758 oomongzu
Modal Verbs: How to Survive a Real Life Zombie Apocalypse (Essential life advice for your students!)
 
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WARNING: In the likely event of a world-ending zombie apocalypse, watch this video & teach students modal verbs and zombie survival skills! It’s every man for himself! (Intermediate level) If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. For the “No Music” version of this video, please click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qv4i7bstpjQ Title of English / ESL Video: How to Survive a Real Life Zombie Apocalypse Target English Grammar: Modal verbs of obligation, no obligation, advice, suggestions and options, prohibition, permission and strong recommendation. Also known as: – Modals. – Modal auxiliaries. – Modal auxiliary verbs. – Modal helping verbs. – Modal words. Target words and phrases: have to, don’t have to, must, mustn’t, allowed to, not allowed to, can, can’t, should, shouldn’t, ought to. Student Proficiency Level: Intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English and Zombie Survival crash courses. Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Modal Verbs Approximate chronological order: Story: – Starts: 0:00 – Ends: 3:44 Rules and Explanation: – Starts: 3:45 – Ends: 5:45 Meaning / Function (Definition): Target grammar can be used for obligation, no obligation, advice, suggestions and options, prohibition, permission and strong recommendations. Uses / Pragmatics: Obligation: must, have to, have got to: – Example sentence 1: You have to follow the Rule of Threes. – Example sentence 2: You must find a place with fresh air. *Must and have to have very similar meanings. No obligation: don’t have to. – Example sentence: You don’t have to be the fastest runner. Prohibition: mustn’t, not allowed to, can’t. – Example sentence 1: You mustn’t venture too far from your home. – Example sentence 2: Make sure you use your left hand. Otherwise, you won’t be allowed to eat at the dining table. *Must and have to have very similar meanings, but mustn’t and don’t have to have completely different meanings. Permission: can, allowed to. – Example sentence: Just because you’re allowed to enter creepy, old, abandoned buildings, doesn’t mean you should. Advice, suggestions and opinions: should, shouldn’t, ought to. – Example sentence 1: If you run over someone in your car at night, you shouldn’t stop and check to see if they’re ok. – Example sentence 2: You should‘ve told me earlier. Strong recommendations: must, have to, have got to. – Example sentence: You‘ve got to try living on a boat. Other Phrases for Advice, Suggestions and Opinions: You’ll want to, it’s in your best interest, take my advice. – Example sentence 1: If it’s a zombie, you’ll want to keep driving. – Example sentence 2: Either way, it’s in your best interest to keep on driving. – Example sentence 3: So if you don’t want to be dead, take my advice…
Views: 24888 oomongzu
Relative Clauses / Adjective Clause: Mike, the luckiest guy I know. (Comical ESL Video Story)
 
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Follow the comical story of Mike, the luckiest guy in the world and teach relative clauses / adjective clause to upper-intermediate level learners. If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging & interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. For the “No Music” version of this video, please click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BDZRRuK_hQU Title of English / ESL Video: Mike – The Luckiest Guy I Know Target English Grammar: Relative clauses (also known as adjective clause or adjectival clause): – Defining clauses (also known as restrictive clauses or identifying clauses). – Non-defining clauses (also known as non-restrictive clauses or non-identifying clauses). – Relative pronouns. – Relative adverbs. – Reduced clauses. Student Proficiency Level: Upper-intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English: Relative Clauses / Adjective Clause Approximate chronological order: Storyline: – Starts at 0:00. Ends at 4:04 Grammar Rules and Explanation: Function: – To identify people/things or to give more information about them. – They act as adjectives and are hence also called adjectival / adjective clause. – They are subordinate / dependent clauses and can't be stand alone sentences. – They begin with a relative pronoun: who, whom, whose, which or that. – Or a relative adverb: when, where, why. Forms: – Relative pronoun / relative adverb + subject + verb – Relative pronoun / relative adverb (as subject) + verb Relative Pronouns: – which = things: He works at the top modelling agency in town, which he loves. – who = people: Mike’s mother is a loving woman, who makes him breakfast in bed every morning. – Who is a subject pronoun & refers to the subject of the clause (i.e. doer of the action). – whom = people: Jessica gave birth to a beautiful baby boy, whom grew up to be a handsome young lad. – Whom is an object pronoun & refers to the object of the clause (i.e. receiver of the action.) – Whom is not often used today as it sounds unusually formal. Instead, we use who for both subjects & objects of clauses. – Example: Jessica gave birth to a beautiful baby boy, who grew up to be a handsome young lad. (This is perfectly acceptable.) – whose = people: Barbara, whose personality was fun and outgoing, was the perfect match. – Whose is the possessive relative pronoun of who & which. – Whose & who’s are completely different words. – Who’s = who is – that: In informal language we can use "that" to replace who, whom & which. – Example 1 (whom): Mike went out and asked out the first girl that he saw. – Example 1 (whom): Mike went out and asked out the first girl whom he saw. – Example 2 (which): He had spent all the money that he found. – Example 2 (which): He had spent all the money which he found. Relative Adverbs: – where = places: We used to play together at the playground where we made friends with the older kids. – when = time: He was my best friend when we were at school. – why = reason: This is why I love Hawaii. Subject and Object of the Clause: – Adjectival clauses can be used as either the subject or the object of the clause. – Example 1 (subject of the clause): Barbara, who was the lucky girl, immediately said “yes”. – Example 2 (object of the clause): Jessica gave birth to a beautiful baby boy, whom grew up to be a handsome young lad. Defining Clause: Function: – To identify or classify nouns. – To tell us which person or thing, or which kind of person or thing, is referred to. – To give us essential information about the person or thing. Details: – Example: Mike is the luckiest guy whom I know. – There is no comma before the relative pronoun / relative adverb in defining clauses. – We can use that to replace who, whom or which in defining clauses. – Example: Mike is the luckiest guy that I know. Reduced Clause: – We can leave out the relative pronoun if they are the object of a defining clause. – Example: Mike is the luckiest guy I know. – We cannot leave out the relative pronoun if they are the subject of a defining clause. – Example: Barbara, who was the lucky girl, immediately said “yes”. Non-Defining Clause: Function: – To give which is non-essential information about a person or thing which is already identified. – They do not identify or classify nouns. Details: – There is a comma before the relative pronoun / relative adverb in non-defining clauses. – We cannot use that to replace who, whom or which in non-defining clauses. – We cannot leave out the relative pronoun to make reduced clauses in non-defining clauses.
Views: 12315 oomongzu
Future Simple Tense - Will Won’t: Whiteboard Animation (No Music)
 
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This is the "No Music" version. For the version with background music, please click here: http://oomongzu.com/pre-intermediate/future-simple/ If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu Use this creative ESL whiteboard animation video to teach future simple tense (will / won’t) to pre-intermediate learners in a fun & engaging manner! WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. Title of English / ESL Video: Whiteboard Animation Target English Grammar: Future simple tense (will / won’t) Also known as: the simple future. *"be going to" is not explained in this video. Student Proficiency Level: Pre-intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Future Simple Tense – Will / Won’t Approximate chronological order: Functions and Uses: – Promises: I will love you forever. – Offers: I‘ll help you eat it! – Spontaneous or quick decisions: I‘ll get help… – Spontaneous threats: I‘ll make you sorry! – Predictions about the future: In the future… you will die! Form: Positive: will Contractions: I’ll, you’ll, we’ll… Negative: will not Contraction: won’t – Use contractions when speaking. Summary of Functions and Uses Other Important Information: "will" and "won’t" vs. "be going to" The simple future tense comes in two variations: - "Will" and "won’t" - "be going to" These two variations can have different meanings and cannot always be used interchangeably. be going to is used for talking about future plans and also for making predictions. While will and won’t can also be used to make predictions, we do not use them to talk about future plans. Hence, only in the case of making predictions, may we use will and won’t and be going to interchangeably. Take for example: Speaker A: Can you wash the car today? Speaker B: I’ll do it tomorrow. Speaker B did not plan on washing the car tomorrow. Rather, it was a spontaneous decision caused by speaker A’s request. Had speaker B said I’m going to do it tomorrow, it would suggest that speaker B already planned on washing the car tomorrow prior to speaker A asking. This video only focuses on will and won’t. We will explore be going to in other videos.
Views: 3758 oomongzu
Relationships and Marital Statuses (Vocabulary): Life of Miss Johnson (Comical ESL Video) (No Music)
 
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This is the "No Music" version. For the version with background music, please click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KZadulNELoQ&feature=youtu.be If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu Follow the comical love life of Miss Johnson and teach your learners new vocabulary for relationships and marital statuses. Teachers may also use this story to review learners on the past simple tense: was/were, regular verbs and irregular verbs. Click the link to watch the past simple tense video: http://oomongzu.com/pre-intermediate/past-simple-tense/ WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. Title of English / ESL Video: The Life of Miss Johnson Target English Vocabulary Relationships and marital statuses Student Proficiency Level Pre-Intermediate level Suggested Courses General English Instructions – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Vocabulary: Relationships and Marital Statuses Approximate chronological order: Story – Starts: 0:00 – Ends: 2:16 Vocabulary Explanation: – Starts: 2:16 – Ends: 12:02 a bachelor (noun) a bachelorette (noun) A bachelor is a single man. At the beginning of the story, Mr. Smith was a bachelor. A bachelorette is a single woman. We use bachelor and bachelorette to describe both young and older people. At the beginning of the story, Miss Johnson was a bachelorette. a spouse (noun) A spouse can be either a husband or a wife. After Miss Johnson and Mr. Smith got married, they became spouses. a partner (noun) A partner is a person in a relationship with another, but is not married. However, when we think of a partner, we usually think of a serious relationship. They probably have been in a relationship for a long time, and are likely to be living together. However, a partner can also be a spouse. So partner has two meanings. to divorce (verb) a divorce (noun) be divorced (adjective) After Miss Johnson and Mr. Smith got married, they broke up. In this case, we say they divorced. Only married couples can divorce. Unmarried couples cannot divorce. They can only break up. be separated (adjective) to separate (verb) When a married couple decide to get a divorce, this usually takes a long time. It could take even years. During this time, many people don’t live together with their spouse anymore. In this case, the couple haven’t divorced yet. They are separated. If a husband needs to go overseas for a year for work, but the wife stays at home, they are not separated, because they still want to stay married. When the husband returns home, he will continue living with his wife. a widow (noun) a widower (noun) be widowed (verb/adjective) After Mr. Williams was hit by a car and died, Miss Johnson wasn’t married anymore. She became a widow. A widow is a female. A widowed is a male. After Miss Johnson married Mr. Jones, she wasn’t a widow anymore. She became married again. to propose (verb) a proposal (noun) When Mr. Jones asked Miss Johnson to marry him, we call this action a proposal. be engaged (adjective) to get engaged (adjective) After Mr. Jones proposed to Miss Johnson and she said yes, they won’t be married until their wedding. So between the time Miss Johnson said yes, and their wedding, they are engaged. We usually use the verb get with engaged. Example Sentence: Miss Johnson and Mr. Jones got engaged. a fiancé (noun) a fiancé (noun) a fiancée (noun) a fiancée (noun) When Miss Johnson and Mr. Jones were still dating, Mr. Jones was Miss Johnson’s boyfriend. But after they got engaged, Mr. Jones became Miss Johnson’s fiancé. There are many ways of pronouncing this. The two most common ways of pronouncing this are either stressing on the a or the é. A fiancé is a male. A fiancée is a female. These two are spelt differently, but pronounced the same. marital status (noun) Marital status is another word for a relationship status. Common examples of marital statuses include single, married, divorced, separated, widowed and engaged. These are adjectives and they are gender-neutral. So they can be used for either men or women. When we are filling out forms; for example, driver’s licence forms, library card forms or even mobile phone contracts; we often need to give our marital status.
Views: 4960 oomongzu
Comparative & Superlative Adjectives & Adverbs: Discover East Asia (No Music)
 
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This is the "No Music" version. For the version with background music, please click here: http://oomongzu.com/pre-intermediate/comparative-and-superlative-adjectives-adverbs/ If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu Join us on a magical journey & discover East Asia’s hidden treasures. (Comparatives and superlatives: adjectives & adverbs at pre-intermediate level.) WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. Title of English / ESL Video: Discover East Asia Target English Grammar: Comparatives and Superlatives: – Regular adjectives. – Irregular adjectives. – Regular adverbs. – Irregular adverbs. Student Proficiency Level: Pre-intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English and English for Hotel and Tourism. Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Comparatives and Superlatives Approximate chronological order: Adjectives: Comparative Adjectives: – To compare two things or people. – comparative adjective + than. Superlative Adjectives: – To say which is the most ________ in a group. – the + superlative adjective. Changing some two-syllable adjectives or adjectives with more than two syllables: – Comparative adjectives: more/less + adjective (+ than). – “than” is optional when it is obvious what the sentence is comparing. – Example 1: Japan is less colourful in the winter than in the spring. – Example 2: The Shwedagon Pagoda is more majestic at night. – Superlative adjectives: the most/least + adjective. – Example 1: Siem Reap has the most awe-inspiring temples in Cambodia. – Example 2: Laos is probably the least touristy country in South East Asia. Making Comparisons with Nouns: – more/less (+ than): uncountable nouns. – more/fewer (+than): countable nouns. – Example 1: Philippines has less rain in the high season, but more rain in the low season. – Example 2: Philippines has more tourists in the high season, but fewer tourists in the low season. – We can use less for countable nouns in informal language: …but less tourists in the low season. Adverbs: Regular Adverbs: – Comparative adverbs: more/less adverb (+ than): quickly – more/less quickly; carefully – more/less carefully. – Superlative adverbs: the most/least + adverb: quickly – the most/least quickly; carefully – the most/least carefully. – Example 1: People walk less quickly in Bangkok than anywhere else in Thailand. People walk the least quickly in Bangkok. – Example 2: Drivers drive more quickly in the rain. Drivers drive the most carefully in the rain. – Elicitation from learners. Irregular Adverbs: – Comparative adverbs: For example, hard – harder; well – better, badly – worse. – Superlative adverbs: For example, hard – hardest; well – best, badly – worst. – Example: People work harder in summer. People work the hardest in summer. Additional Information: – Superlative + Present Perfect: – Example 1: China has the grandest ice sculptures I‘ve ever seen. – Example 2: Seoul is the most alluring city we‘ve ever been to. – the + Superlative or Possessive + Superlative: – Example 1: Taipei 101 is Taiwan’s most iconic landmark. – Example 2: Taipei 101 is their most iconic landmark. Other Comparative Phrases: – (not) + as + adjective / adverb + as. – Example 1: Bali is as famous as Jakarta. – Example 2: Motorcyclists in Saigon don’t ride as quickly as motorcyclists in other cities. – just + (not) + as + adjective / adverb + as: For emphasizing that the two things or people are equal or not equal. – Example: The mosques in Brunei are just as breathtaking as the ones in Malaysia. – just + (not) + as + adjective / adverb: Shortened form. – Example: The food at five star restaurants in Singapore are delicious, but the street food is just as mouth-watering. After “than” or “as” we can use: – Object pronouns (me, him, her, etc.) – Example 1: He’s shorter than me. – Example 2: He isn’t as tall as me. – Subject pronouns (I, he, she, etc.) + auxiliary verb. – Example 1: He’s shorter than I am. – Example 2: He isn’t as tall as I am. – These are incorrect: – He’s shorter than I. – He isn’t as tall as I.
Views: 3383 oomongzu
Past Continuous Tense vs. Past Simple: Elissa and the Mysterious Stalker (No Music)
 
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This is the "No Music" version. For the version with background music, please click here: http://oomongzu.com/pre-intermediate/past-continuous/ If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu Watch the suspense thriller short about Elissa and the mysterious stalker & present the past continuous tense vs. past simple to students in a pre-intermediate level lesson. WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. Title of English / ESL Video: Elissa and the Mysterious Stalker Target English Grammar: Past Continuous Tense vs. Past Simple Tense. (Also known as Past Progressive Tense and Simple Past Tense) Student Proficiency Level: Pre-intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English. Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Past Continuous Tense vs. Past Simple Approximate chronological order: Storyline: – Starts at 0:00. Ends at 2:40. English Grammar Rules and Explanations: Function: – To talk about an action still in progress in the past. Timeline: – Someone was chasing her. – Someone started chasing her in the past, but we don’t know when. – That person stopped chasing her some time in the past. Again, we don’t know when. – We are talking about the whole period from the beginning of the chase to the end. Specific Uses: – Background event: – On a cold dark night, Elissa was working late at the office. – This sentence sets the setting and the background of the story. Simple Past: – To talk about completed or repeated actions. – She quickly ran into the cemetery. – This action is finished and completed. – When we use two simple past actions, the second action happened after the first action. For example, – She quickly ran into the cemetery and hid there. – So she ran into the cemetery first, then she hid inside the cemetery. Combining the Past Progressive Tense with the Simple Past: – Past progressive = longer action – Past simple = shorter action – The shorter action happened while the longer action was still in progress. But sometimes these two actions happen at the same time. – Example: As she was leaving her office, she realised the streets were now empty. – Elissa leaving her office is the longer action. – Elissa realising the streets were empty is the shorter action. – So Elissa was leaving her office and during this time, she noticed the streets were now empty. But she didn’t stop leaving the office when she noticed this. Specific Uses: – Interruption: Sometimes a shorter action interrupted a longer action. – Example: While she was walking back home, she heard some footsteps behind her. She turned around to look. – Elissa walking back home is the longer action. – Hearing the footsteps is the shorter action. – In this case, the footsteps interrupted her walking and made her stop to look back before she continued walking again. Multiple Progressive Actions in the Same Sentence: – Multiple actions happening at the same time. – Example: I was walking home and someone was following me. – We don’t know which action started first. – We also don’t know which action finished first. – We only know that during a certain period in the past these two actions were happening at the same time. – We can use more than two past progressive actions in the same sentence, and all these actions were happening at the same time some time in the past. Form: Statements: Subject + was/were + verb (-ing) + … Elissa + was + working + late. Yes/No Questions: Was/were + subject + verb (-ing) + …? Was + Elissa + working + late? Open Questions: Wh-/How + was/were + subject + verb (-ing) + …? Why + was + Elissa + working + late? Conjunctions: – We use conjunctions to join past simple and progressive actions. – Example conjunctions: while, when, as. – Example sentence 1: While she was walking back home, she heard some footsteps behind her. – Example sentence 2: When Elissa was hiding, the footsteps stopped. – Example sentence 3: As she was running, she saw a cemetery. Switching the Order of the Tenses: – We can also place the simple past action at the front of the sentence before the past continuous action. – Example: She heard some footsteps behind her while she was walking back home. Concept Checking Questions (CCQs)
Views: 7357 oomongzu
Comparative & Superlative Adjectives: Z-Men Superheroes (Exciting, thrilling & humours ESL Video)
 
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Don’t miss the exciting first episode of the superhero comic Z-Men! Teach comparative and superlative adjectives to elementary level learners. If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. For the “No Music” version of this video, please click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i2Hb4lPxEj4 Title of English / ESL Video: Z-Men Target English Grammar: Comparative and superlative adjectives. Irregular adjectives. Student Proficiency Level: Elementary level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Comparative and Superlative Adjectives Approximate chronological order: Introduction of superheroes: – Zack: One-syllable and some two-syllable adjectives. – Stronger than a lion. He is the strongest man in the universe. – Bullet Boy: One-syllable and some two-syllable adjectives. – Faster than a bullet. He is the fastest boy in the world. – Lava Girl: One- or two-syllable adjectives ending with a vowel and a consonant. – Hotter than the sun. She is the hottest girl in our galaxy. – Xena: one- or two-syllable adjectives ending with a vowel and a consonant. – Deadlier than any weapon. Her eyes are the deadliest weapon ever. – School: One- or two-syllable adjectives ending with “e”. – Fighting bad guys is simpler than going to school. – Dr. Bad Guy!: Other two-syllable and more than two syllable adjectives. Also, irregular adjectives. – More dangerous than anyone. He is the most dangerous scientist on the planet. Grammar: Comparative and Superlative Adjectives Comparative Adjectives: – comparative adjective + than: To compare two people or things. – Example: Zack is stronger than a lion. Superlative Adjectives: – the + superlative adjective: To say which is the most ________ in a group. – Example: Zack is the strongest man in the universe. Changing one-syllable and some two-syllable adjectives: – Comparatives: +er – Example: strong – stronger – Superlatives: +est – Example: strong – the strongest Changing one- or two-syllable adjectives ending with “e”: – Comparatives: +r – Example: simple – simpler – Superlatives +st – Example: simple – the simplest Vowels and Consonants: – Alphabet = vowels + consonants – Vowels = a, e, i, o, u. – Consonants = b, c, d, f, g, h, j, k, l, m, n, p, q, r, s, t, v, w, x, y, z. Changing one- or two-syllable adjectives ending with a vowel and a consonant: – Comparatives: x2 consonant, +er. – Example: hot – hotter – Superlatives: x2 consonant, +est. – Example: hot – the hottest Changing one- or two-syllable adjectives ending with a consonant + “y”: – Comparatives: -y, +ier. – Example: deadly – deadlier – Superlative: -y, +iest. – Example: deadly – the deadliest Changing other two-syllable and more than two-syllable adjectives: – Comparatives: more + adjective – Example: dangerous – more dangerous – Superlatives: most + adjective – Example: dangerous – the most dangerous Irregular Adjectives: – Comparative: bad – worse – Superlative: bad – worst Concept Checking Questions (CCQs)
Views: 33060 oomongzu
Gerunds and Infinitives (Verbs) (No Music)
 
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This is the "No Music" version. For the version with background music, please click here: http://oomongzu.com/upper-intermediate/gerunds-and-infinitives/ If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu This creative & engaging animated ESL video teaches learners about gerunds and infinitives (verbs) at the upper-intermediate level. Use this in class and have a blast! WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. Title of English / ESL Video: Gerunds and Infinitives (Verbs) Target English Grammar: Gerunds and Infinitives (Verbs): – Gerund verbs. – Infinitives with “to”. – Infinitives without “to”. Student Proficiency Level: Upper-intermediate level grammar. Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Gerunds and Infinitives (Verbs) Approximate chronological order: Gerunds: – Elicitation of target grammar. Form: – Verb + ing Function: – Gerunds act as nouns or pronouns. Specific Uses: – Likes/dislikes: I love shopping. – General activities: I’m good at dancing. – Abstract ideas: I’m not used to working late. – When there is no noun to describe something: Catching the train during peak hour is really annoying. – When speaking or writing in incomplete sentences: What are your hobbies? Watching TV and surfing the Internet. Use Gerunds: – As the subject of a sentence: Flying makes me nervous. – As the object of a sentence: I find listening to music very relaxing. – After prepositions: The police arrested her for speeding. – After phrasal verbs: She ended up going to prison. – After some verbs including: admit, avoid, can’t help, carry on, consider, deny, finish, give up, imagine, involve, keep on, miss, postpone, practice, risk, spend, stop, suggest. – Example: You should avoid taking a stroll outside during a hurricane. – After words for expressing like/dislike: can’t stand, crazy about, enjoy, fancy, hate, like/dislike, keen on, love, don’t mind, prefer. – Example: I love skydiving. Use Infinitives (with “to”): – To express a reason or purpose: He ran to avoid being caught. – After adjectives: This safe is easy to break open. – After some verbs, including: can/can’t afford, agree, appear, be able to, can’t wait, decide, expect, forget, happen, have (got), help, hope, learn, manage, need, offer, plan, pretend, promise, refuse, remember, seem, teach, tend, threaten, try, want, would like. – Example: He threatened to hurt the man. *Infinitives are not generally used as the subject of sentences. Use the Infinitive (without “to”) after: – Modal verbs: You should see a doctor. – Auxiliary verbs: We‘ll go swimming tomorrow. – let, make and help. – Example 1: Let‘s go shopping. – Example 2: Help me carry my shoes. – Example 3: Sometimes she makes me want to scream! Negative Forms: Target language form the negative with “not”: – Gerunds: I don’t like shopping. – Infinitives (with “to”): I don’t want to go shopping. – Infinitives (without “to”): I won’t go shopping. These verbs can be followed with either the gerund or infinitive (with “to”) with no difference in meaning: – begin, continue, prefer, start. For example: – I prefer doing yoga. – I prefer to do yoga. These verbs can be followed with either the gerund or infinitive (with “to”), but the meaning is different: – try, remember, forget, need. – Example 1: – Try not to hurt yourself again. (This means, make an effort to do something.) – You should try going to an Italian restaurant. (This means, try something to see if you like it.) – Example 2: – Remember to fasten your seatbelt. (This means, don’t forget something.) – I remember seeing you in high school. (This means, having a memory of something.) – Example 3: – I forgot to bring my luggage. (This means, you didn’t remember something.) – I’ll never forget seeing the beautiful scenery. (This means, you did something and you won’t forget it. It’s more common in the negative form.) – Example 4: – You need to buy a new car. (This means, you must do something.) – That car needs repairing. (This means, the subject needs something.)
Views: 1400 oomongzu
Passive Voice & Active Voice: Top 5 UFO Conspiracy Theories (Thought-provoking ESL video)
 
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Wake up from the matrix & see the truth about UFOs. Teach intermediate learners passive voice & active voice using this eye-opening ESL video about UFO conspiracy theories. If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. For the “No Music” version of this video, please click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRM37pnmJ98 Title of English / ESL Video: Top 5 UFO Conspiracy Theories Target English Grammar: Passive voice and active voice. Also known as, passive tense and active tense. Student Proficiency Level: Intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Passive Voice and Active Voice Approximate chronological order: Passive Voice and Active Voice: – The active tense focuses on the doer. – The passive focuses on the action. – Passive form: be + past participle + by – We can add by to say who did the action. – The passive can come in a variety of tenses. 5. Area 51: Present Simple: – Area 51 is commonly believed to be a top secret US army research base for alien technology. – Even though the US government denied the existence of Area 51, aircrafts are forbidden to fly over the base. Past Simple: – In 2013, the existence of Area 51 was finally officially acknowledged by the CIA. 4. Roswell: Past Simple: – A UFO crash site was discovered. – We can add the location of the event at end of the sentence when it is important. – ...at a ranch near Roswell, New Mexico. – We can add the date of the event either in the beginning or at the end of the sentence. – ...in 1947. – We can also add other important contextual information. In this case, the doer is not included, because it is not important. However, we can add it at the end of the sentence. – ...by an army personnel. Past Continuous: – By the time the media arrived, the crash site was already being covered up. – The doer is not mentioned, because it is obvious who the doer is: the US government. Present Perfect: – Since then many photos of alien bodies found at Roswell have been leaked. – The doers are not mentioned, because they are unknown. 3. JFK Assassination: Past Simple: – On 22nd November 1963, American President John Fitzgerald Kennedy was assassinated. Past Perfect: – Coincidentally, JFK had been assassinated before he received the UFO documents. – The doer is deliberately left out, because the focus of the sentence is on the topic and not the doer. The topic of the sentence is: JFK’s assassination before receiving the UFO documents. Present Present: – Today, many UFO documents have been declassified. However, they show no evidence of the existence of UFOs. Future Simple (going to): – Many theorists hope that one day more prominent documents are going to be declassified. 2. Illuminati: Present Continuous: – The world is being secretly controlled by a secret society called the Illuminati. Future Simple (will): – Many theorists hope that one day the Illuminati will be exposed. – The doer is left out, because it is not important or not interesting. The action or the act of exposing the Illuminati is more important than who will do it. Summary of Passive and Active: – Use the passive tense when: – the doer is unknown. – the doer is not important or interesting. – the doer is obvious. – the doers are people in general. – the focus is on the topic of the sentence or the action. – The passive tense is more formal and less personal than the active tense as it focuses on the action and topic; and not the people. It is common in scientific, technical and academic writing. #1 UFO Conspiracy Theory: The Hollow Earth Theory – Instruct students to identify the passives and their tenses. – Present simple: An alien race is believed to live in the centre of our planet. – Past perfect: After Adolf Hitler had been defeated in World War 2, he escaped to the centre of the Earth. – Present perfect: This is why Hitler’s body still has not been found. – Past simple: This operation was codenamed Operation Highjump. – Present continuous: …the results of this operation is still being covered up. – Past simple: …the naval fleet was attacked by unknown aircrafts. – Although the doers are unknown, they are important, so they are mentioned. It also emphases the fact that the doers are unknown. – Past continuous: They were destroyed while (they were) being readied for battle. – Future simple (will): Hopefully, the results of this operation will be declassified in the future.
Views: 2980 oomongzu
Relative Clause / Adjective Clause: Mind-Bending Universe Theories (ESL Video) (Relative Pronoun)
 
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Enlighten your students with some mind-bending universe theories & present relative clause / adjective clause with relative pronouns at the intermediate level. If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. For the “No Music” version of this video, please click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-WlXrOYhT0 Title of English / ESL Video: Mind-Bending Theories about the Universe Target English Grammar: Relative clauses (also known as adjective clause or adjectival clause): – Defining clauses (also known as restrictive clauses or identifying clauses). – Non-defining clauses (also known as non-restrictive clauses or non-identifying clauses). – Relative pronouns. – Relative adverbs. Student Proficiency Level: Intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Relative Clause / Adjective Clause Approximate chronological order: Theories about the Universe: – Starts at 0:00. Ends at 5:10 – The Simulation Hypothesis – The Many-Worlds Theory – Quantum Theory and Consciousness – The Hologram Universe Theory – Speed of Light and Time Grammar Rules and Explanation: Function: – To give information about a person, place, thing or time. – They are common in everyday communication and also in academic writing. – Two types of clauses: defining and non-defining clause. – Also known as: restrictive and non-restrictive or identifying and non-identifying clause. Form: Relative pronoun / relative adverb + subject + verb Defining Clause: Function: – To give essential information to identify a person, place, thing or time. Relative Pronouns: – who = people: Maybe in one new universe you married someone who didn’t go to school with you. – which = things: In future, our computers will be advanced enough to create simulations which are as realistic as real life. Relative Adverbs: – where = place: The universe is a place where everything is a hologram. – when = time: Travelling faster than the speed of light will send you back to a time when nothing existed. *No comma before the relative pronoun or relative adverb. *that = who or which (in informal language) – Example 1: In future, our computers will be advanced enough to create simulations that are as realistic as real life. – Example 2: Maybe in one new universe you married someone that didn’t go to school with you. Non-Defining Clause: Function: – To give non-essential information. The sentence makes sense without it. Relative Pronouns: – which: Computers today can already create highly complex simulations, which are very realistic. – who: Last year you married your partner, who was your classmate at school. Relative Adverbs: – where: You’re actually just looking at a blank surface, where fake images are projected on. – when: One day, when human technology is advanced enough, we will know the truth. *Notice that there is a comma before the relative pronoun or relative adverb. *We can’t use that to replace who or which. Possessive Relative Pronoun: whose = of who / of which – It is the possessive relative pronoun of both people and things. – Example 1 (thing): The brain is a computer whose function is to store our consciousness. – Example 2 (person): Albert Einstein, whose reputation is world famous, is one of the inventors of quantum theory.
Views: 2395 oomongzu
Comparative & Superlative Adjectives: Z-Men Superheroes (No Music)
 
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This is the "No Music" version. For the version with background music, please click here: http://oomongzu.com/elementary/comparatives-and-superlatives/ If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu Don’t miss the exciting first episode of the superhero comic Z-Men! Teach comparative and superlative adjectives to elementary level learners. WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. Title of English / ESL Video: Z-Men Target English Grammar: Comparative and superlative adjectives. Irregular adjectives. Student Proficiency Level: Elementary level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Comparative and Superlative Adjectives Approximate chronological order: Introduction of superheroes: – Zack: One-syllable and some two-syllable adjectives. – Stronger than a lion. He is the strongest man in the universe. – Bullet Boy: One-syllable and some two-syllable adjectives. – Faster than a bullet. He is the fastest boy in the world. – Lava Girl: One- or two-syllable adjectives ending with a vowel and a consonant. – Hotter than the sun. She is the hottest girl in our galaxy. – Xena: one- or two-syllable adjectives ending with a vowel and a consonant. – Deadlier than any weapon. Her eyes are the deadliest weapon ever. – School: One- or two-syllable adjectives ending with “e”. – Fighting bad guys is simpler than going to school. – Dr. Bad Guy!: Other two-syllable and more than two syllable adjectives. Also, irregular adjectives. – More dangerous than anyone. He is the most dangerous scientist on the planet. Grammar: Comparative and Superlative Adjectives Comparative Adjectives: – comparative adjective + than: To compare two people or things. – Example: Zack is stronger than a lion. Superlative Adjectives: – the + superlative adjective: To say which is the most ________ in a group. – Example: Zack is the strongest man in the universe. Changing one-syllable and some two-syllable adjectives: – Comparatives: +er – Example: strong – stronger – Superlatives: +est – Example: strong – the strongest Changing one- or two-syllable adjectives ending with “e”: – Comparatives: +r – Example: simple – simpler – Superlatives +st – Example: simple – the simplest Vowels and Consonants: – Alphabet = vowels + consonants – Vowels = a, e, i, o, u. – Consonants = b, c, d, f, g, h, j, k, l, m, n, p, q, r, s, t, v, w, x, y, z. Changing one- or two-syllable adjectives ending with a vowel and a consonant: – Comparatives: x2 consonant, +er. – Example: hot – hotter – Superlatives: x2 consonant, +est. – Example: hot – the hottest Changing one- or two-syllable adjectives ending with a consonant + “y”: – Comparatives: -y, +ier. – Example: deadly – deadlier – Superlative: -y, +iest. – Example: deadly – the deadliest Changing other two-syllable and more than two-syllable adjectives: – Comparatives: more + adjective – Example: dangerous – more dangerous – Superlatives: most + adjective – Example: dangerous – the most dangerous Irregular Adjectives: – Comparative: bad – worse – Superlative: bad – worst Concept Checking Questions (CCQs)
Views: 1912 oomongzu
Second Conditional - Conditional Sentences (No Music)
 
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This is the "No Music" version. For the version with background music, please click here: http://oomongzu.com/intermediate/second-conditionals/ If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu Teach learners about second conditionals (conditional sentences) using this creative & engaging animated ESL video for intermediate level classrooms. WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. Title of English / ESL Video: Second Conditionals Target English Grammar: 2nd Conditionals: – Conditional sentences / conditional clauses – If clause + result clause / clauses of result – Also known as: – condition clause + consequence clause – subordinate clause + main clause / other clause – dependent clause + independent clause. Student Proficiency Level: Intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Second Conditionals – Conditional Sentences Approximate chronological order: Rules and Explanations: – Elicitation of target language. Function: – To talk about hypothetical or imaginary situations in the present or future and their consequences. Specific Uses: – Elicitation of target language. – To express desires: If I were rich, I’d buy a big house. – In 2nd conditionals, we use were after any pronoun in the if clause. – Using was in informal language is still perfectly fine. – To give advice: If I were you, I’d buy a new phone. – For short we can just say the result clause: I’d buy a new phone. Could: – could = would be able to – Example: If I spoke Greek, I could ask Sophia out. If only…: – We use If only… to say that we want things to be different. – It has a similar meaning to I wish…, but with a stronger emotion. – Example 1: If only I were rich, I’d buy a big house! – Example 2: If only I spoke Greek, I’d ask Sophia out! – We often say this without the result clause. – Example 1: If only I were rich! – Example 2: If only I spoke Greek! – We don’t use If only… for giving advice. We only use it to express desires. Concept Checking Questions (CCQs) Form: – If clause, + result clause – If/Unless + past simple, + would + verb (base form) – If + I ate everything, + I’d + get fat. – If + I were you, + I’d + buy a new phone. Switching Clause Positions: – Result clause + if clause – I’d get fat + if I ate everything. – I’d buy a new phone + if I were you. Summary of Functions and Uses: – To talk about hypothetical or imaginary situations in the present or the future and their consequences. – To express desires. – To give advice.
Views: 1595 oomongzu
If Clause Type 1: Bella & The Three Stooges (Comical sitcom your students will love! - ESL video)
 
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Watch the comical story of Bella and the three stooges and learn about the various forms of if clause type 1 for upper-intermediate level classes. If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. For the “No Music” version of this video, please click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QwNW9uZNcQo Title of English / ESL Video: Bella and the Three Stooges Target English Grammar: If Clause Type 1 (First Conditional / 1st Conditional): – Conditional clauses / conditional sentences – If clause + result clause / clauses of result – Also known as: – condition clause + consequence clause – subordinate clause + main clause / other clause – dependent clause + independent clause. – Imperatives – Modal verbs – Should – Future time clauses Student Proficiency Level: Upper-intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: If Clause Type 1 Approximate chronological order: Storyline: – Starts and 0:00. Ends at 2:32. First Conditional: Function: – To talk about possible present or future situations and their consequences. Forms: Most Common Form: – If + present simple, + future simple (will) – Also known as: If + present simple, + will/won’t + verb (base form) Real Form: – If + any present tense, + any future tense – Or: – If + any future tense, + any future tense – Any present tense: present simple, present continuous, present perfect, present perfect continuous. – Any future tense: future simple (“will” or “going to”), future continuous, future perfect, future perfect continuous. Examples: – If + present simple, + future simple (will) – If + you do your job, + we’ll be on our dream holiday to Europe by tomorrow. – If + present simple, + future continuous – If + I have free time, + I’ll be seeing my friend. – If + present simple, + future perfect – If + Matthew stops bothering me, + I’ll have finished my assignment by tomorrow. – If + present perfect, + future simple (going to) – If + Matthew has broken into my house again, + I’m going to kill him! – First conditionals talk about present or future events. However, using the present perfect makes it a past event. – If + present continuous, + modal – If + you’re cleaning the bathroom, could you change the towels? – The function of this sentence is a polite request. This polite request is in the form of a yes/no question. – If + future simple (will), + future simple (will) – If + you’ll meet with me tonight, + I’ll take you somewhere special. – This sentence is both a request and an offer. Using “will” in the if clause makes the sentence more polite. This polite request/offer is in the form of a statement and not a yes/no question like the previous example. – If + present simple, + future perfect continuous – Elicitation from students. – If + you start now, + you’ll have been cleaning out this house for two hours by midnight. – If + present perfect continuous, + modal – Elicitation from students. – If + he has been following my orders, + he should be out any time now.
Views: 9774 oomongzu
Definite Article & Indefinite Article – a an the: Amazing World Facts (No Music)
 
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This is the "No Music" version. For the version with background music, please click here: http://oomongzu.com/intermediate/definite-indefinite-articles/ If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu Liven the classroom & teach definite article & indefinite articles (a, an, the) with some amazing world facts. (Intermediate level) WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. Title of English ESL Video: Amazing World Facts Target Grammar: English Articles (Grammar): – Definite article. – Indefinite articles. – a, an, the. – Zero article / no article. Students’ Proficiency Level: Intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English and English for Hotel and Tourism. Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Approximate chronological order: We use indefinite articles (a, an): – for singular countable nouns. – the first time you talk about a person or thing: An assassin bug kills other insects and wears their dead bodies as armour. – when you say what a person or a thing is: This is an assassin bug. – when you say what a person does. For example, their profession or their hobby: She’s a banzai skydiver. – in exclamations with “what”: What an exciting sport! – when we don’t know which one something is, when something is not specific, or when something is one of many: A can of diet coke floats in water, but a can of regular coke sinks. – with some fixed phrases: once a week, 60km an hour, a few, a couple. E.g. Eating a few pieces of dark chocolate a day can be good for your body. We use the definite article (the): – when we talk about something we mentioned earlier: There is a swing in Ecuador. The swing has no safety measures and hangs from an old treehouse. – when something is unique and there’s only one of it: The Hawaiian alphabet has only 12 letters. – when the person or thing you’re referring to is clear and obvious: In Australia only 2% of the population lives within the yellow area. – for job titles that only one person can have: Jose Mujica was the President of Uruguay. – with superlatives: He was also the poorest President in the world. – with some fixed phrases: at the top, on the right, in the south, in the east, at the beginning, at the end, in the centre, in the middle, on the coast, on the border, in the world, the next, the other. E.g. There is an underwater waterfall on the coast of Mauritius. It’s located in the south of the island. We don’t use articles: – when we’re talking about things in general: Dolphins can only sleep with half their brain. Compare this with: – A dolphin can only sleep with half its brain. – The dolphins in the Amazon River are pink. – with some nouns: at home, at work, at school, at university, at church, in bed, in hospital, in prison, on holiday (after prepositions such as “at”, “in”, “on”, “to”, “from”.) E.g: – Norway allows students from around the world to study at any public university in their country for free. – This is the world’s most annoying alarm clock. If you don’t get out of bed in time, it runs away and hides from you. – before meals: You should never skip breakfast. It’s the most important meal of the day. Time phrases – definite article: – parts of the day: in the morning, in the afternoon, in the evening. – dates: May the 4th is the international Star Wars day. – decades. – centuries: The 20th Century is actually the 1900s. So right now we’re in the 21st Century. Time phrases – zero article / no article: – parts of the day: at night, at lunchtime. – days. – months. – seasons. – years. – Example 1: In Russia, winter starts in December and ends in February. – Example 2: In the winter, the average temperature is lower than -50 degrees Celsius. – before: next/last + day/week, etc. – Example 1: I saw David last Saturday. – Example 2: I’ll see you next week. – Example 3: It’s the last day of school. (We use the here, because we’re talking about the last or final one.) Summary table
Views: 924 oomongzu
First Conditional - Conditional Sentences: I want to watch Pokemon! (No Music)
 
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This is the "No Music" version. For the version with background music, please click here: http://oomongzu.com/pre-intermediate/first-conditional/ If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu Teach first conditional (conditional sentences) with this lighthearted video about a day in the life of a girl & her father, set for pre-intermediate level classes. WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. Title of English / ESL Video: I want to watch Pokemon! Target English Grammar: First Conditional: – Conditional sentences / conditional clauses – If clause + result clause / clauses of result – Also known as: – condition clause + consequence clause – subordinate clause + main clause / other clause – dependent clause + independent clause. Student Proficiency Level: Pre-intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: First Conditional – Conditional Sentences Approximate chronological order: 1st Conditional: – Elicitation of target grammar. Functions: – We use the 1st conditional to talk about a possible event or situation, in the present or the future, and its result or consequence. Uses: – Possibilities and uncertain events and situations with results and consequences. – Example 1: If I miss the bus, I’ll catch a taxi. – Example 2: If we miss the bus again, I’ll be late for my favourite show! – Future plans and invitations: If the weather’s good tomorrow, we’ll go to the park. – Offers and promises: If I finish my work, I’ll watch Pokemon with you. – Negotiations: If you help me make dinner, I’ll help you with your homework. – Threats and warnings: If you keep acting like this, you’ll be grounded for a week! – Polite requests: If you’ll give me a moment, I’ll be right there sweetie! 1st Conditional Forms: Statements: – If clause, + result clause – Also known as, condition clause + consequence clause, or subordinate clause + main clause / other clause. – If + any present tense, + any future tense. – Most common form: If + present simple, + future simple (with “will”) – Example: If + I miss the bus, + I’ll catch a taxi. Using “Unless”: – We can also replace “if” with “unless” in the if clause. – Example: Unless I miss the bus, I won’t catch a taxi. Switching the Positions of the Clauses: – Result clause + if clause – I’ll catch a taxi if I miss the bus. – No comma when the result clause comes first. Yes/No Questions: – If + present simple, + will + subject + verb (base form) – Elicitation from students. – Example: If + you miss the bus, + will + you + catch a taxi? – Short Answers: – Yes, I will. – No, I won’t. – Elicitation from students. Open Questions: – If + present simple, + wh-/how + will + subject + verb (base form) – Example: If + you miss the bus, + how + will + you + get home? – Elicitation from students. Summary of Functions and Uses Concept checking questions (CCQs)
Views: 1657 oomongzu
Definite Article & Indefinite Article– a an the: Amazing World Facts (ESL Video)
 
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Liven the classroom & teach definite article & indefinite articles (a, an, the) with some amazing world facts. (Intermediate level) If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. For the “No Music” version of this video, please click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=icjnDXQMQLQ Title of English ESL Video: Amazing World Facts Target Grammar: English Articles (Grammar): – Definite article. – Indefinite articles. – a, an, the. – Zero article / no article. Students’ Proficiency Level: Intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English and English for Hotel and Tourism. Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Approximate chronological order: We use indefinite articles (a, an): – for singular countable nouns. – the first time you talk about a person or thing: An assassin bug kills other insects and wears their dead bodies as armour. – when you say what a person or a thing is: This is an assassin bug. – when you say what a person does. For example, their profession or their hobby: She’s a banzai skydiver. – in exclamations with “what”: What an exciting sport! – when we don’t know which one something is, when something is not specific, or when something is one of many: A can of diet coke floats in water, but a can of regular coke sinks. – with some fixed phrases: once a week, 60km an hour, a few, a couple. E.g. Eating a few pieces of dark chocolate a day can be good for your body. We use the definite article (the): – when we talk about something we mentioned earlier: There is a swing in Ecuador. The swing has no safety measures and hangs from an old treehouse. – when something is unique and there’s only one of it: The Hawaiian alphabet has only 12 letters. – when the person or thing you’re referring to is clear and obvious: In Australia only 2% of the population lives within the yellow area. – for job titles that only one person can have: Jose Mujica was the President of Uruguay. – with superlatives: He was also the poorest President in the world. – with some fixed phrases: at the top, on the right, in the south, in the east, at the beginning, at the end, in the centre, in the middle, on the coast, on the border, in the world, the next, the other. E.g. There is an underwater waterfall on the coast of Mauritius. It’s located in the south of the island. We don’t use articles: – when we’re talking about things in general: Dolphins can only sleep with half their brain. Compare this with: – A dolphin can only sleep with half its brain. – The dolphins in the Amazon River are pink. – with some nouns: at home, at work, at school, at university, at church, in bed, in hospital, in prison, on holiday (after prepositions such as “at”, “in”, “on”, “to”, “from”.) E.g: – Norway allows students from around the world to study at any public university in their country for free. – This is the world’s most annoying alarm clock. If you don’t get out of bed in time, it runs away and hides from you. – before meals: You should never skip breakfast. It’s the most important meal of the day. Time phrases – definite article: – parts of the day: in the morning, in the afternoon, in the evening. – dates: May the 4th is the international Star Wars day. – decades. – centuries: The 20th Century is actually the 1900s. So right now we’re in the 21st Century. Time phrases – zero article / no article: – parts of the day: at night, at lunchtime. – days. – months. – seasons. – years. – Example 1: In Russia, winter starts in December and ends in February. – Example 2: In the winter, the average temperature is lower than -50 degrees Celsius. – before: next/last + day/week, etc. – Example 1: I saw David last Saturday. – Example 2: I’ll see you next week. – Example 3: It’s the last day of school. (We use the here, because we’re talking about the last or final one.) Summary table
Views: 4683 oomongzu
Relative Clauses / Adjective Clause: Mike, the luckiest guy I know. (No Music)
 
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This is the "No Music" version. For the version with background music, please click here: http://oomongzu.com/upper-intermediate/relative-clauses/ If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu Follow the comical story of Mike, the luckiest guy in the world and teach relative clauses / adjective clause to upper-intermediate level learners. WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. Title of English / ESL Video: Mike – The Luckiest Guy I Know Target English Grammar: Relative clauses (also known as adjective clause or adjectival clause): – Defining clauses (also known as restrictive clauses or identifying clauses). – Non-defining clauses (also known as non-restrictive clauses or non-identifying clauses). – Relative pronouns. – Relative adverbs. – Reduced clauses. Student Proficiency Level: Upper-intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English: Relative Clauses / Adjective Clause Approximate chronological order: Storyline: – Starts at 0:00. Ends at 4:04 Grammar Rules and Explanation: Function: – To identify people/things or to give more information about them. – They act as adjectives and are hence also called adjectival / adjective clause. – They are subordinate / dependent clauses and can't be stand alone sentences. – They begin with a relative pronoun: who, whom, whose, which or that. – Or a relative adverb: when, where, why. Forms: – Relative pronoun / relative adverb + subject + verb – Relative pronoun / relative adverb (as subject) + verb Relative Pronouns: – which = things: He works at the top modelling agency in town, which he loves. – who = people: Mike’s mother is a loving woman, who makes him breakfast in bed every morning. – Who is a subject pronoun & refers to the subject of the clause (i.e. doer of the action). – whom = people: Jessica gave birth to a beautiful baby boy, whom grew up to be a handsome young lad. – Whom is an object pronoun & refers to the object of the clause (i.e. receiver of the action.) – Whom is not often used today as it sounds unusually formal. Instead, we use who for both subjects & objects of clauses. – Example: Jessica gave birth to a beautiful baby boy, who grew up to be a handsome young lad. (This is perfectly acceptable.) – whose = people: Barbara, whose personality was fun and outgoing, was the perfect match. – Whose is the possessive relative pronoun of who & which. – Whose & who’s are completely different words. – Who’s = who is – that: In informal language we can use "that" to replace who, whom & which. – Example 1 (whom): Mike went out and asked out the first girl that he saw. – Example 1 (whom): Mike went out and asked out the first girl whom he saw. – Example 2 (which): He had spent all the money that he found. – Example 2 (which): He had spent all the money which he found. Relative Adverbs: – where = places: We used to play together at the playground where we made friends with the older kids. – when = time: He was my best friend when we were at school. – why = reason: This is why I love Hawaii. Subject and Object of the Clause: – Adjectival clauses can be used as either the subject or the object of the clause. – Example 1 (subject of the clause): Barbara, who was the lucky girl, immediately said “yes”. – Example 2 (object of the clause): Jessica gave birth to a beautiful baby boy, whom grew up to be a handsome young lad. Defining Clause: Function: – To identify or classify nouns. – To tell us which person or thing, or which kind of person or thing, is referred to. – To give us essential information about the person or thing. Details: – Example: Mike is the luckiest guy whom I know. – There is no comma before the relative pronoun / relative adverb in defining clauses. – We can use that to replace who, whom or which in defining clauses. – Example: Mike is the luckiest guy that I know. Reduced Clause: – We can leave out the relative pronoun if they are the object of a defining clause. – Example: Mike is the luckiest guy I know. – We cannot leave out the relative pronoun if they are the subject of a defining clause. – Example: Barbara, who was the lucky girl, immediately said “yes”. Non-Defining Clause: Function: – To give which is non-essential information about a person or thing which is already identified. – They do not identify or classify nouns. Details: – There is a comma before the relative pronoun / relative adverb in non-defining clauses. – We cannot use that to replace who, whom or which in non-defining clauses. – We cannot leave out the relative pronoun to make reduced clauses in non-defining clauses.
Views: 1364 oomongzu
If Clause Type 1: Bella & the Three Stooges (No Music)
 
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This is the "No Music" version. For the version with background music, please click here: http://oomongzu.com/upper-intermediate/first-conditionals/ If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu Watch the comical story of Bella and the three stooges and learn about the various forms of if clause type 1 for upper-intermediate level classes. WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. Title of English / ESL Video: Bella and the Three Stooges Target English Grammar: If Clause Type 1 (First Conditional / 1st Conditional): – Conditional clauses / conditional sentences – If clause + result clause / clauses of result – Also known as: – condition clause + consequence clause – subordinate clause + main clause / other clause – dependent clause + independent clause. – Imperatives – Modal verbs – Should – Future time clauses Student Proficiency Level: Upper-intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: If Clause Type 1 Approximate chronological order: Storyline: – Starts and 0:00. Ends at 2:32. First Conditional: Function: – To talk about possible present or future situations and their consequences. Forms: Most Common Form: – If + present simple, + future simple (will) – Also known as: If + present simple, + will/won’t + verb (base form) Real Form: – If + any present tense, + any future tense – Or: – If + any future tense, + any future tense – Any present tense: present simple, present continuous, present perfect, present perfect continuous. – Any future tense: future simple (“will” or “going to”), future continuous, future perfect, future perfect continuous. Examples: – If + present simple, + future simple (will) – If + you do your job, + we’ll be on our dream holiday to Europe by tomorrow. – If + present simple, + future continuous – If + I have free time, + I’ll be seeing my friend. – If + present simple, + future perfect – If + Matthew stops bothering me, + I’ll have finished my assignment by tomorrow. – If + present perfect, + future simple (going to) – If + Matthew has broken into my house again, + I’m going to kill him! – First conditionals talk about present or future events. However, using the present perfect makes it a past event. – If + present continuous, + modal – If + you’re cleaning the bathroom, could you change the towels? – The function of this sentence is a polite request. This polite request is in the form of a yes/no question. – If + future simple (will), + future simple (will) – If + you’ll meet with me tonight, + I’ll take you somewhere special. – This sentence is both a request and an offer. Using “will” in the if clause makes the sentence more polite. This polite request/offer is in the form of a statement and not a yes/no question like the previous example. – If + present simple, + future perfect continuous – Elicitation from students. – If + you start now, + you’ll have been cleaning out this house for two hours by midnight. – If + present perfect continuous, + modal – Elicitation from students. – If + he has been following my orders, + he should be out any time now.
Views: 784 oomongzu
Passive Voice & Active Voice: Top 5 UFO Conspiracy Theories (No Music)
 
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This is the "No Music" version. For the version with background music, please go here: http://oomongzu.com/intermediate/passive/ If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu Wake up from the matrix & see the truth about UFOs. Teach intermediate learners passive voice & active voice using this eye-opening ESL video about UFO conspiracy theories. WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. Title of English / ESL Video: Top 5 UFO Conspiracy Theories Target English Grammar: Passive voice and active voice. Also known as, passive tense and active tense. Student Proficiency Level: Intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Passive Voice and Active Voice Approximate chronological order: Passive Voice and Active Voice: – The active tense focuses on the doer. – The passive focuses on the action. – Passive form: be + past participle + by – We can add by to say who did the action. – The passive can come in a variety of tenses. 5. Area 51: Present Simple: – Area 51 is commonly believed to be a top secret US army research base for alien technology. – Even though the US government denied the existence of Area 51, aircrafts are forbidden to fly over the base. Past Simple: – In 2013, the existence of Area 51 was finally officially acknowledged by the CIA. 4. Roswell: Past Simple: – A UFO crash site was discovered. – We can add the location of the event at end of the sentence when it is important. – ...at a ranch near Roswell, New Mexico. – We can add the date of the event either in the beginning or at the end of the sentence. – ...in 1947. – We can also add other important contextual information. In this case, the doer is not included, because it is not important. However, we can add it at the end of the sentence. – ...by an army personnel. Past Continuous: – By the time the media arrived, the crash site was already being covered up. – The doer is not mentioned, because it is obvious who the doer is: the US government. Present Perfect: – Since then many photos of alien bodies found at Roswell have been leaked. – The doers are not mentioned, because they are unknown. 3. JFK Assassination: Past Simple: – On 22nd November 1963, American President John Fitzgerald Kennedy was assassinated. Past Perfect: – Coincidentally, JFK had been assassinated before he received the UFO documents. – The doer is deliberately left out, because the focus of the sentence is on the topic and not the doer. The topic of the sentence is: JFK’s assassination before receiving the UFO documents. Present Present: – Today, many UFO documents have been declassified. However, they show no evidence of the existence of UFOs. Future Simple (going to): – Many theorists hope that one day more prominent documents are going to be declassified. 2. Illuminati: Present Continuous: – The world is being secretly controlled by a secret society called the Illuminati. Future Simple (will): – Many theorists hope that one day the Illuminati will be exposed. – The doer is left out, because it is not important or not interesting. The action or the act of exposing the Illuminati is more important than who will do it. Summary of Passive and Active: – Use the passive tense when: – the doer is unknown. – the doer is not important or interesting. – the doer is obvious. – the doers are people in general. – the focus is on the topic of the sentence or the action. – The passive tense is more formal and less personal than the active tense as it focuses on the action and topic; and not the people. It is common in scientific, technical and academic writing. #1 UFO Conspiracy Theory: The Hollow Earth Theory – Instruct students to identify the passives and their tenses. – Present simple: An alien race is believed to live in the centre of our planet. – Past perfect: After Adolf Hitler had been defeated in World War 2, he escaped to the centre of the Earth. – Present perfect: This is why Hitler’s body still has not been found. – Past simple: This operation was codenamed Operation Highjump. – Present continuous: …the results of this operation is still being covered up. – Past simple: …the naval fleet was attacked by unknown aircrafts. – Although the doers are unknown, they are important, so they are mentioned. It also emphases the fact that the doers are unknown. – Past continuous: They were destroyed while (they were) being readied for battle. – Future simple (will): Hopefully, the results of this operation will be declassified in the future.
Views: 928 oomongzu
Discover East Asia (A Magical Journey - ESL Video)
 
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Join us on a magical journey & discover East Asia’s hidden treasures. (Comparatives and superlatives: adjectives & adverbs at pre-intermediate level.) If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. For the “No Music” version of this video, please click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=52_yFf_snJ8 Title of English / ESL Video: Discover East Asia Target English Grammar: Comparatives and Superlatives: – Regular adjectives. – Irregular adjectives. – Regular adverbs. – Irregular adverbs. Student Proficiency Level: Pre-intermediate level grammar Suggested Courses: General English and English for Hotel and Tourism. Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Comparatives and Superlatives Approximate chronological order: Adjectives: Comparative Adjectives: – To compare two things or people. – comparative adjective + than. Superlative Adjectives: – To say which is the most ________ in a group. – the + superlative adjective. Changing some two-syllable adjectives or adjectives with more than two syllables: – Comparative adjectives: more/less + adjective (+ than). – “than” is optional when it is obvious what the sentence is comparing. – Example 1: Japan is less colourful in the winter than in the spring. – Example 2: The Shwedagon Pagoda is more majestic at night. – Superlative adjectives: the most/least + adjective. – Example 1: Siem Reap has the most awe-inspiring temples in Cambodia. – Example 2: Laos is probably the least touristy country in South East Asia. Making Comparisons with Nouns: – more/less (+ than): uncountable nouns. – more/fewer (+than): countable nouns. – Example 1: Philippines has less rain in the high season, but more rain in the low season. – Example 2: Philippines has more tourists in the high season, but fewer tourists in the low season. – We can use less for countable nouns in informal language: …but less tourists in the low season. Adverbs: Regular Adverbs: – Comparative adverbs: more/less adverb (+ than): quickly – more/less quickly; carefully – more/less carefully. – Superlative adverbs: the most/least + adverb: quickly – the most/least quickly; carefully – the most/least carefully. – Example 1: People walk less quickly in Bangkok than anywhere else in Thailand. People walk the least quickly in Bangkok. – Example 2: Drivers drive more quickly in the rain. Drivers drive the most carefully in the rain. – Elicitation from learners. Irregular Adverbs: – Comparative adverbs: For example, hard – harder; well – better, badly – worse. – Superlative adverbs: For example, hard – hardest; well – best, badly – worst. – Example: People work harder in summer. People work the hardest in summer. Additional Information: – Superlative + Present Perfect: – Example 1: China has the grandest ice sculptures I‘ve ever seen. – Example 2: Seoul is the most alluring city we‘ve ever been to. – the + Superlative or Possessive + Superlative: – Example 1: Taipei 101 is Taiwan’s most iconic landmark. – Example 2: Taipei 101 is their most iconic landmark. Other Comparative Phrases: – (not) + as + adjective / adverb + as. – Example 1: Bali is as famous as Jakarta. – Example 2: Motorcyclists in Saigon don’t ride as quickly as motorcyclists in other cities. – just + (not) + as + adjective / adverb + as: For emphasizing that the two things or people are equal or not equal. – Example: The mosques in Brunei are just as breathtaking as the ones in Malaysia. – just + (not) + as + adjective / adverb: Shortened form. – Example: The food at five star restaurants in Singapore are delicious, but the street food is just as mouth-watering. After “than” or “as” we can use: – Object pronouns (me, him, her, etc.) – Example 1: He’s shorter than me. – Example 2: He isn’t as tall as me. – Subject pronouns (I, he, she, etc.) + auxiliary verb. – Example 1: He’s shorter than I am. – Example 2: He isn’t as tall as I am. – These are incorrect: – He’s shorter than I. – He isn’t as tall as I.
Views: 2064 oomongzu
Used to (Grammar): David's Secret Past (No Music)
 
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This is the "No Music" version. For the version with background music, please click here: http://oomongzu.com/pre-intermediate/used-to/ If you love our videos, please support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oomongzu Discover David’s secret past and teach pre-intermediate level learners used to (grammar) & “didn’t use to” using this ESL video story. WEBSITE: http://oomongzu.com For more creative, engaging and interactive animated grammar teaching videos, please visit our website. Title of English / ESL Video: David’s Secret Past Target English Grammar: Used to (grammar) with “didn’t use to” and past simple. Student Proficiency Level: Pre-intermediate level Suggested Courses: General English Instructions: – Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first. – Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs). Summary of English Grammar: Used to (Grammar) Approximate chronological order: Rules and Explanation: – Elicitation of example sentence. Function: – To talk about things that happen repeatedly or regularly or over a long period of time in the past, but are usually not true now. – We can also use the past simple instead. Example: – I played football every weekend. – I used to play football every weekend. Specific Uses: – Past habits: I used to eat healthy. – Past states: I used to be strong. – Preferences, feelings, thoughts, ideas, etc.: I used to like this girl at work. – We use didn’t use to to talk about things that are true now, but weren’t true before. – Example: I didn’t use to smoke. Actions that only happened once: – We don’t use used to for actions that only happened once. Instead, we use the past simple. – Example: I went to Egypt last year. (Past simple – This is correct.) – Example: I used to go to Egypt last year. (Used to – This is incorrect.) Timeline: – Used to / didn’t use to talks about something that happened regularly in the past. – It started at an unknown time in the past and stopped happening at an unknown time in the past. Form: Statements: – Subject + used to / didn’t use to + verb (base form) + … – I + used to + play + football every weekend. – We can use both action and non-action verbs with used to. – Action verbs: play, eat, smoke, went, etc. – Non-action verbs: be, like, have, afraid, etc. – Used to + not… any more / any longer (present simple) – We use not… any more / any longer to contrast with used to. – Example: I used to play football every weekend, but I don’t any more / any longer. Yes/No Questions: – Did / didn’t + subject + use to + verb (base form) + …? – Did + you + use to + play + football every weekend? Open Questions: – Wh-/how + did / didn’t + subject + use to + verb (base form) + …? – What sport + did + you + use to + play + ? “d”: – Elicitation from students: Why is there a d in used to, but no d in didn’t use to. – Didn’t is already in the past tense, so we don’t change use into the past tense as well. Past Tense vs. Present Tense: – Used to / didn’t use to = past tense – Don’t use used to / didn’t use to for present tense sentences. – Instead use: present simple + usually for present tense sentences. – Example: I usually play football every weekend. Concept Checking Questions (CCQs) Summary of Functions and Uses: – To talk about things that happened repeatedly or regularly or over a long period of time in the past, but are usually not true now. – Repeated actions in the past. – Past habits. – Past states. – Past preferences, feelings, thoughts, ideas, etc.
Views: 888 oomongzu

Pubg Hints Tips Guide Pubg Hints Secrets The Upside to Pubg Game Modes Pubg Game Modes Can Be Fun for Everyone When you launch the game for the very first time, you have to first pick a username before going into the character creator interface. If you prefer, you can host a customized game with a group of friends and make your own rules. Unfortunately, theres no game out there which exactly resembles GGO. Games unfortunately are a luxury and not a necessity, so they are most likely likely to be among the very first things to think about when deciding where you have to cut back on so far as your budget is concerned. Because it is a popular game. The British game is different than the majority of the others on the planet at the present time. If you believe there are different games like PUBG which are not on the list, and that we ought to cover, dont hesitate to set them in the comments below. Previous and current players can often provide a lot of insight into the advantages and disadvantages of each website, which will be able to help you decide. They start with a pickaxe that can be used to break down objects in the world. They are also limited to only six crate purchases a week. The greater skin value a player increases the pot, the greater chance the player has to win. You may also take items from different players who have died. You dont need to understand different players to have a very good time playing by yourself can be a whole lot of fun, in fact but its a multiplayer-only game that takes a constant connection to the net. It is going to be intriguing to observe how close you were to other players through the full match without ever even knowing. Vital Pieces of Pubg Game Modes Event Mode is going to be unranked, but players will nonetheless earn BP. It will be available for everyone who owns the game, and can be accessed from the main menu. Zombie Mode is going to be played by many human teams in addition to 90 zombie players that will attempt to eliminate each other in the battlefield. Theres currently not an unranked mode either, so youll probably die early and often whenever youre just beginning, which might become frustrating. The solo mode doesnt ask that you team up with different buddies. Each game mode delivers a completely special experience and tests your limit in various ways. The squad game mode permits you to form a group of 4 players. Pubg Game Modes Can Be Fun for Everyone Based on everybodys skills, maps differ from close range to medium or massive places. Since that time, the community-made map was retooled and remastered nearly a dozen times, and is presently known as Dust2. The in-game map outlines the circular zone which you want to reach from the offset, and the HUD shows a handy graph of the rest of the distance youve got to cover and how long youve left to get there. 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