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How to prepare for an interview - 01 - English at Work has the answers
 
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Anna has an interview at Tip Top Trading. This episode helps her and you prepare for an interview by providing answers to interview questions. English at work helps you learn the language you need to get a job and to work in an office environment. For more: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/english-at-work
Views: 259407 BBC Learning English
BBC Learning English: Video Words in the News: The oldest person to climb Everest (29th May 2013)
 
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Watch our weekly news video. This week's video is: Oldest Everest climber. Meet the Japanese man who is the oldest person ever to have reached the top of Everest, 60 years after it was first climbed.
Views: 124354 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: The words 'was' and 'were'
 
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Tim's back in his Pronunciation Workshop. This time he's finding out how English speakers sometimes pronounce the words 'was' and 'were' - even though he's a bit tired. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-13/session-5 Transcript: Tim Hi. I'm Tim and this is my Pronunciation Workshop. Here, I'm going to show you how English is really spoken. Come on, let's go inside. Oh dear, excuse me. I’m a bit tired: I was out late last night, with the lads. I know, yeah, we didn't get back until 9.30. In the evening. It was a wild night. I know, I know, I am a party animal. Anyway, while I get myself together a bit, let's ask some other people in London what they got up to last night. Voxpops At 9 o'clock last night I was watching a movie. I was laying in bed. I was invited to a dinner at my friend's house. I was playing football I was out drinking. Tim Well well, what interesting lives we all lead. Now they all used the past form of the verb 'to be' – was. Now the word was is made of the sounds /w/, /ɔ:/, / z/, isn’t it? Or is it? Listen again. What sound can you actually hear? Voxpops At 9 o'clock last night I was watching a movie. I was laying in bed. I was invited to a dinner at my friend's house. I was playing football I was out drinking. Tim When the word was is unstressed, as in the examples we’ve just heard, then the vowel sound changes to a schwa - /ə/. So was becomes /wəz/, and also were becomes /wə/. These are called weak forms. Here are some more examples. Examples I was there when it happened. We were delighted with the results. We were having a good time until it rained. He was feeling much better last night. Tim Right, now you've heard the examples, and now it's your turn. Listen and repeat. Examples I was there when it happened. We were delighted with the results. We were having a good time until it rained. He was feeling much better last night. Tim Great work. Remember, if you want to learn more about pronunciation, then please visit our website, bbclearningenglish dot com. And that is about it from the Pronunciation Workshop for now. I'll see you soon. Bye bye! Now… oh look! Hey, you know what this is? This is WAS backwards. Get it? WAS backwards… it's a SAW. Now, I know what you were thinking. You were thinking that I was going to have some terrible accident. Well don’t worry – it’s not even switched on – look! Wooahhhhh!!!
Views: 303005 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: Schwa
 
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English pronunciation is easy, right? Well, maybe it isn't always a piece of cake, but Tim's back in the pronunciation workshop and ready to give a helping hand. This time he's looking at an aspect of spoken English called ‘schwa’. The symbol for the schwa sound looks like this /ə/. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-6/session-5 Transcript: Tim Hi, I'm Tim and this is my pronunciation workshop. Here, I'm gonna show you how English is really spoken. It'll help you to become a better listener and a more fluent speaker. You ready? Come on, follow me. Now, there's an idiom in the English language that means that something is really easy. Any idea what it is? Well, here's a clue. Do you know now? Let's ask the people of London: Voxpops It's a piece of cake It's a piece of cake It's a piece of cake It's a piece of cake Tim A piece of cake – an expression that means that something is really easy to do, as well as meaning – a piece of cake. But listen again to the words 'a' and 'of'. They are actually pronounced the same. What is the sound and are those words stressed? Voxpops It's a piece of cake It's a piece of cake It's a piece of cake It's a piece of cake Tim The words 'a' and 'of' are both pronounced as /ə/ and they're not stressed. This sound /ə/ is the most common sound in the whole English language. It's so common that it even has its own name – schwa. Now, it can be difficult to hear the schwa because it is never stressed. However, it's a vowel sound that's used in many grammar words like articles and prepositions. Here are some more examples. Examples I like a cup of tea in the morning. Could you get a packet of biscuits? Can you give it to me? I had an apple for lunch today. Tim So, you've heard the examples, and now it's your turn. Are you ready to start? Listen and repeat. Examples I like a cup of tea in the morning. Could you get me a packet of biscuits? Can you give it to me? I had an apple for lunch today. Tim Great work. Now remember, if you want to learn more about pronunciation then please visit our website: bbclearningenglish.com. That's about it from the pronunciation workshop for now. I'll see you soon. Bye bye. Now, I've got a cup of tea and I've got a biscuit, I'm looking forward to a piece of cake. That was a mistake, but a tasty one.
Views: 132936 BBC Learning English
BBC Masterclass: Words used to connect ideas - anyway, actually, basically (Discourse markers)
 
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Discourse markers are words and phrases we use to connect and organise our ideas. They act like signposts, telling the listener what information is coming up next. Sian will share eight discourse markers with you – and she'll let you listen to her telephone conversation to do this! For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-16/session-1 Transcript: Hi Sian here for BBC Learning English. There are signposts everywhere - today in this Masterclass we're going to look at ways you can use signposting when you're speaking. So, there are signposts everywhere and they tell us where to go, but did you know that when we're speaking we use signpost words and phrases to help direct the listener? These are called discourse markers. They help connect what we're saying and tell the listener what information is coming up. They'll help you sound more fluent and help you understand native speaker conversations. Listen to my telephone call this morning. I use eight different discourse markers – can you hear all eight...? ...You know I was hosting an amazing dinner party last night? Actually, it was a complete disaster - I burnt the meat… people arrived when I was still cooking. Mind you, I did say 'turn up when you want'… and I did start cooking pretty late! Anyway, as I was saying, I burnt the meat, the dishes were all ready at different times... the dessert was… oh come to think of it, I completely forgot to serve dessert! So basically, everyone went home hungry. Anyway, how was your evening? By the way, before I forget, it's my birthday next week and I'm having a dinner party do you want to come? So the first discourse marker I used was you know, we use this to say: 'I'm going to tell you some information that you already know.' ''You know I was hosting an amazing dinner party last night?'' The second one I used was actually - we use this when we're about to give some surprising information or correct some information. "Actually, it was a complete disaster". Then I used mind you - we use this when we're about to give an afterthought that contrasts the information that came before, so, "people arrived when I was still cooking. Mind you, I did say 'turn up when you want'..." The next discourse marker I used was anyway, as I was saying. As I was saying is very useful because it means: 'I'm going to return to what I was talking about before'. So, "as I was saying, I burnt the meat" This is a previous topic. Then I used the discourse marker come to think of it, we use this when you've just remembered or thought of something as you're speaking "oh come to think of it, I completely forgot to serve dessert!" I'm remembering this as I'm speaking. Then I used basically - basically is used to summarise what you're going to say. "So basically, everyone went home hungry". The next one I used was anyway - anyway is really useful and very common. We use it to say 'I'm going to change topic now' or 'I'm going to go back to the original topic' or 'I'm going to finish what I was talking about'. "Anyway, how was your evening?" And the final one I used was by the way - we use this to say 'I'm going to change direction and talk about something that's not connected to the main topic. "By the way, before I forget, it's my birthday next week." So basically that's your introduction to discourse markers. We use them all the time, when we're speaking... and come to think of it, when we're writing too. By the way, we have a website bbclearningenglish.com where you can practise these and find out more information. Anyway see you soon. Goodbye.
Views: 136587 BBC Learning English
BBC English Masterclass: Being polite - how to soften your English
 
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Sian's going to show you 4 ways not to offend people by being too direct. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-24/session-1 TRANSCRIPT Sian Hi Sian here for BBC Learning English… in this Masterclass we're going to look at something British people love doing! Being polite. No, I'm not coming to your party this evening. Wow, this food is disgusting! Give me some of your lunch. Now sometimes it’s ok to be direct – or even blunt with your friends…but it's important not to sound rude, particularly in the workplace. We're going to look at 4 ways you can soften your language to make you more polite… 1: Requests, suggestions and questions. OK, listen to these two requests. Which one sounds more polite and less direct, and why? Number 1: ‘Pick me up on your way to the party this evening!’ Or number 2: ‘I was hoping you could give me a lift to the party.’ Now, number 2 is much more polite. We soften requests, and suggestions and questions by using past forms, continuous forms or both. For example, ‘I was wondering if you could give me a lift later.’ We can also make requests softer by using a negative question with a question tag. So, ‘You couldn’t give me a lift later, could you?’ or ‘I don’t suppose you could pick me up tonight, could you?’ 2: Giving opinions OK, listen to these two opinions. Which do you think sounds less direct and more polite? Number 1: You're too young to get married! Or number 2: I reckon you're a little young to be getting married! Yeah, the second one is much less direct. It’s softer. We use verbs like reckon, guess, feel to make your opinions less direct. You can also use vague expressions like ‘sort of’, ‘kind of’, ‘a little bit’. It also helps if you make it into a question: ‘Aren’t you kind of young to be getting married?’ 3: Discussing problems Ok now listen to these two problems. Which one sounds less direct? The first one: ‘You've made a mistake in this report!’ Or the second one: ‘You seem to have made a mistake here.’ Yes, the second one was softer, less direct. We introduce problems with verbs like seem and appear to soften them. So, ‘You appear to have saved over all my documents’. You can also use these to introduce your own problems. So, ‘I seem to have lost those reports you wanted’. 4: Saying no! Now listen to these two ways of refusing an invitation. Which one sounds less direct? Number 1? ‘No, I'm not coming to your party this evening.’ or number 2? ‘I’m not sure I'll be able to make it to your party this evening.’ Ok, again the second one was much softer, less direct. We find it really hard to say no! So instead we use tentative language to soften it. So, ‘I’m not sure I’ll make it to your party.’ Or ‘It’s looking unlikely I’ll be able to come this evening.’ This basically means ‘I’m not coming!’ Now to find out more about avoiding being too direct, and to practise not being rude, I was hoping you would check out our website bbclearningenglish.com. See you soon, goodbye!
Views: 298687 BBC Learning English
Tim's top tips for progressing to advanced English - Stop Saying!
 
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Learning English can be hard work. Progress can seem particularly slow when your level gets higher. What can you do to move from intermediate to advanced? Tim has some tips in the last episode of Stop Saying. For more, visit our website:http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/upper-intermediate/unit-30/session-4
Views: 82947 BBC Learning English
Why do men want to be fathers? Watch 6 Minute English
 
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Why do men want to have children? Evolutionary anthropologist Anna Machin wrote a book about it and tries to answer this question. Catherine and Neil - a father himself - discuss her theories and teach you six items of related vocabulary. Vocabulary: admit to something say something is true, even if it might make you look a little bit bad to be keen on something to be very interested in and enthusiastic about something going along with something agreeing to do something even though you don't really want to do it an absent father a father who is not at home to spend time with his children disciplinarians people who have strict rules and they give out punishments when these rules aren't followed to be hands-on to be very much involved in something You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-180816 [Image: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 68562 BBC Learning English
Short Vowel. Pronunciation Tips.
 
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Learn English and improve your pronunciation with our series of 44 videos designed to help improve your pronunciation and English.
Views: 1474177 BBC Learning English
Are smartphones killing cameras? Watch 6 Minute English
 
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Everybody has a smartphone these days and these devices carry not one, but two cameras! Who buys separate cameras? Catherine and Neil talk about photography and teach you six items of related vocabulary. Vocabulary: obsolete something that has been replaced and is no longer the first choice to drop off a cliff used about, for example, sales numbers, it means sales have fallen significantly over a short period of time opt for something choose something get into something become very interested in an activity frustrated with something disappointed with something take the next rung up do something at a higher level. You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-180823 [Images: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 42964 BBC Learning English
Learn to talk about walks in the countryside in 6 minutes!
 
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You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-180726 Fewer and fewer people are going out for a walk in the countryside. Our obsession with social media platforms seems to have something to do with it. Neil and Catherine talk about the trend of staying indoors and teach you six items of vocabulary. [Image: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 54054 BBC Learning English
Street food: Why is it becoming popular?
 
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Buying food on the street is nothing new but in the UK this idea is really taking off. It's a great way of sampling freshly cooked dishes from around the world. Rob and Neil discuss the subject and hear from an expert who explains the popularity in this type of food - plus you can learn some new vocabulary along the way. Listen to a discussion about street food and learn new items of vocabulary in just 6 minutes! To download the audio and transcript, go to http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-180830 [Cover: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 64060 BBC Learning English
Talk about the power of smells in 6 minutes
 
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Listen to a discussion about the power of smells and hear from a famous perfumer about the how the scent you give off can affect people's opinions of you. You'll find the key words and the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-180503 [Image: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 78406 BBC Learning English
Learn to talk about broken hearts in 6 minutes!
 
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You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-180628 Our heart is an important organ in our body and something we must take care of. Healthy eating and exercise can keep it in good condition but is it still possible to die from being sad and upset - or what we might call 'a broken heart'? 6 Minute English discusses the subject and hears from an expert who explains if this can really happen. Vocabulary nuanced small but important things that need to be considered bereavement sadness we feel when someone close to us dies passed away a more gentle way of saying ‘died’ muddle through get to the end of a difficult situation somehow. Not always by making the right decisions but in the end, getting there time-poor not having enough free time prioritising deciding how important different things are [Images: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 55556 BBC Learning English
Do you lead a sedentary lifestyle? Watch 6 Minute English
 
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Spending too much time in a sedentary position and not being physically active is a problem around the world. In the UK, 20 million people don't do any exercise at all. Finland used to have one of the highest mortality rates from heart disease but it's managed to buck the trend. Dan and Catherine talk about Finland's experience and teach you new vocabulary. Vocabulary: sedentary is our first word in our vocabulary review. It's an adjective used to describe a lifestyle which involves a lot of sitting and not much exercise life-expectancy the age to which you are expected to live shirker someone who avoids doing something they don't like, usually because they are lazy tongue-in-cheek something meant to be humorous and not taken seriously stern adjective that means serious and strict clipboard a board you attach papers to so you write on them as you walk around [Image: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: English In A Minute Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 44718 BBC Learning English
BBC English Masterclass: Mixing conditionals
 
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You all know about the first, second and third conditionals, but do you know how to mix them? Dan has a lesson which will show you how. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-7/session-1 Transcript: Dan Hi guys. Dan from BBC Learning English here. In this session we'll be looking at mixed conditionals. Now, I know that clever students like yourselves will know that English has three types of conditional sentences. First conditional is to talk about real, present or future situations, second conditional is to talk about hypothetical present or future situations and third conditional is to talk about hypothetical past situations. All three types of conditional are fantastic and all three types of conditional talk about events within their own time frame – present, future and past. But what about if you want to talk about an event that happened in the past - which affects the future? Can events in the present or the future affect the past? Come over here and let's take a look. Here is a third conditional sentence: If I had taken programming at school, I would have got a job at Google years ago. Here we have a past hypothetical with a past consequence. Notice the formula: 'If' plus the past perfect here, 'would' plus have plus the past participle here. Now watch what happens as we change the consequence. If I had taken programming at school, I would be working for Google. Now we have a past hypothetical with a present consequence. This part here is from a second conditional. Its formula is 'would' plus the bare infinitive. This kind of makes sense in that decisions or actions in the past affect the present. But can we do the future? Well, let's have a look. If I had taken programming at school, I would be attending the Google conference next week. Yes we can. As you can see, the only difference between the present and the future is the time expression. The formula is exactly the same: 'would' plus the infinitive. Second conditional. Did you get it? Now let's see what happens if we try to make the second – which is the present – affect the past, which is a third. If I were smarter, I would have invented something clever when I was younger. It can. Now we have a present theory with a past result. This can be a little difficult to understand, until we realise that 'if I were smarter' is the same as saying 'I am not smart' - which is present simple. And remember that we use present simple for long term truth. When I say 'I am not smart', I mean: I am not smart now, in the future and in the past. It's the same as saying 'I am English' - past, present and future. So, this kind of conditional works very well with personal descriptions. And here are a couple of other examples. If he were taller, he would have become a basketball player. If they were in love, they would have got married 10 years ago. If I were less interesting, I wouldn't have been asked to speak in public so many times. Did you get it? Good. Let's try one more. Present to past. But a little bit more specific this time. If I weren't flying on holiday next week, I would have accepted that new project at work. Here we have a present second, although it's actually future, with a past third result. This means that the person couldn't accept the project at work because they knew that they would be flying in the future. OK guys, did you get it? Mixing conditionals isn't difficult to do, as long as you both have confidence and an understanding of the verb forms. It's much easier to do a third to second than it is to do a second to third, but both are possible. And finally, don't forget the importance of time words. OK? Alright. Now, for more information have a look at bbclearningenglish.com. I've been Dan, you've been great. Have fun guys, see you next time.
Views: 41003 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: Assimilation of /t/ and /p/
 
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What happens when a word ending with a /t/ sound is followed by a word beginning with a /p/ sound? Tim looks at assimilation, with the help of the Learning English team, some Londoners - and a white piece of paper! You can learn more here http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-1/session-5
Views: 140092 BBC Learning English
Learn different ways of talking about the future - Stop Saying
 
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http://www.bbclearningenglish.com When we think of the future, if we're thinking grammatically, we think of will. However, the future can be different depending on what we're talking about. Will is not the only future, as Tim explores in this video. Learn more here http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/upper-intermediate/unit-24/session-4
Views: 67865 BBC Learning English
Talk about food expertise in 6 minutes
 
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For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/... More and more people in the UK are describing themselves as 'foodies', but do they really know that much about the things they eat? In this 6 Minute English, we hear from one of Britain's top chefs and learn some related vocabulary. Vocabulary foodie someone who is very interested in all aspects of food a little bit a small amount romantic describes an imagined ideal situation affordable something we have enough money to buy in danger of the possibility of something bad happening [Images: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) We like receiving and reading your comments - please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 70122 BBC Learning English
BBC English Masterclass: Formal and informal English
 
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Sometimes formal and informal English can seem like two different languages. Sian's here to show you four features of informal English - and some ways you can make these features more formal. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-19/session-1 Transcript: Hi, Sian here for BBC Learning English. In this Masterclass we're going to look at some differences between formal and informal English. Hey, how's it going? Good afternoon, how are you? Sometimes formal and informal can seem like two different languages. In the same way you wouldn't normally wear shorts and a t-shirt to a job interview, if you use language that's too formal or too informal, you can give a bad impression. Let's look at some differences between formal and informal English. Now, I received an email this morning. Have a look at this email - do you think the language is formal or informal - and why? Dear Mrs Brown, I'm writing to find out whether you have any jobs in your company this summer. At the mo I'm studying Economics at uni. I have been working part-time in a shop and recently they promoted me to the role of manager. I am enthusiastic. I work hard. I pay attention to detail. Ok, so that email used informal language and it's too informal for this style of letter. We're going to look at four features that make this informal and we're going to change it to make it more formal. Number one: choice of vocabulary. In informal English we use more common words and more phrasal verbs. For example here we have a phrasal verb: find out. It would be better to use a more formal equivalent like enquire. Same with jobs, this is quite informal, so instead let's use vacancies here. Instead we have "I'm writing to enquire whether you have any vacancies." Number two. It's more common in informal language to use abbreviations, contractions, shortened forms of verbs. Let's have a look. So, here we have at the mo, which is short for at the moment. This is OK when you're speaking, but not when you're writing. Here, we can use currently which is even more formal. Same here, uni is short for university, so don't use this short form in a letter. "Currently, I am studying Economics at university." Quite often in formal language we choose passive structures over active. Let's have a look here. The active sentences they promoted me is quite informal - it'd be much better to use a passive form here to make it more formal: I was promoted. So, "Recently I was promoted to the role of manager." This doesn't mean don't use active structures in a formal letter, but have a think about whether a passive one is more appropriate. Finally, in informal English, short, simple sentences are much more common. Whereas in formal English, we use more complex sentence structures. Take a look at this one. Here we have three short, simple sentences and this is fine in informal English, but in formal English it's better to use a complex structure. We can do this by adding relative pronouns or linkers. For example, "I am an enthusiastic person who works hard and pays attention to detail. So, would you kindly visit our website... ah, we're friends, that's too formal. Go to our website bbclearningenglish.com for more information about this and to practise formal and informal English. See you soon - goodbye!
Views: 89271 BBC Learning English
Learn to talk about the World Cup in 6 minutes!
 
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You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-180614 The 2018 World Cup is about to kick off in Russia. Many of us will be glued to our TV screens to follow the ups and downs of our own nation's teams and to see who finally becomes the world champion. But not everyone will be sharing the excitement of the tournament. In this programme we hear from people with different viewpoints; Neil and Rob discuss the vocabulary they use. [Images: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 68834 BBC Learning English
Alternatives to 'and' - Stop Saying
 
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Do you use the word 'and' too much? Helen's here to give us a few alternatives – and to entertain us with some wonderful singing and dancing. Learn more here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/upper-intermediate/unit-26/session-4
Views: 50112 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: The linking /r/
 
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What happens when a word ends with a /r/ sound - and the next word begins with a vowel sound? Tim looks at connected speech with the help of the Learning English team, some Londoners - and a Russian novel! You can learn more here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-2/session-5
Views: 103252 BBC Learning English
Giving feedback – 14 – English at Work shows you how
 
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Anna gets feedback from Paul today. Following her successful Imperial Lemon presentation, Anna thinks she's going to get some good feedback from the boss. But rather than being congratulated, she's in trouble because of her poor telephone manner. However, help is at hand, and from an unexpected person... For more English at Work and other great content:: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/english-at-work TRANSCRIPT Narrator: Hello. We're back at Tip Top Trading. Anna is very busy dealing with Mr Lime's big order for Imperial Lemons. (phone rings) Anna: Yes?... Who?... I can't hear you. Mr what? What? Mr Who? I don't know, you tell me. Oh, you are Mr Hu... H-U: Hu. Er... No, Tom's busy. Call back later. Bye. (hangs up) Tom, Mr Hu called you. Tom: Mr Hu- Anna: Mr Hu: H-U Tom: Anna, Mr Hu is a very important- (phone rings) Oh! What now?! (answers) Yes? Tom: (to himself) I'm going to have to talk to the boss about this. Anna: No. I'm busy, give me your number, I'll call you later. Yep, yep, 6... 8... thanks. Bye! (hangs up) Right, now where was I? Paul: Anna, could I have a word? Anna: Yes. (to herself) Ohhh, he must want to tell me how pleased he is with the Citrus Ventures deal. (door closing) Paul: Now, Anna... biscuit? Anna: Thank you. Paul: I'm a little bit concerned about something. Anna: (to herself/whispering) "I'm a little bit concerned..." Doesn't that mean something bad? Narrator: Yes, Anna, Paul is using a polite turn of phrase to say he is unhappy about something. Let's see what he's got to say.... Paul: I think you need to work on your telephone manner. Anna: Work on my telephone manner? Narrator: It means the way you talk on the phone is not good enough and you have to improve it – to work on it to make it better. Paul: Perhaps you should think about … Narrator: Perhaps you should think about – that's a polite way of telling you to do something! Paul: Anna, are you listening to me? Anna: Yes, sorry, I was just sort of, err, talking to myself. Could you repeat what you said please? Paul: Right, I'll start again. I said: I'm a little bit concerned about your telephone manner. You need to work on the way you speak to clients. Perhaps you should think about being a bit more polite to clients; it's important for the image of the company. Anna: Oh (close to tears) okay. Paul: You can go now – take another biscuit with you – that's my last chocolate wafer, you lucky thing! (door opens and closes) Denise: Anna? Is everything all right? Anna: (crying) Yes. Denise: What's the matter? Anna: (between sobs) Paul says I need to w-w-w-work on my telephone manner. Denise: Well I was a bit concerned about it myself. And I think Tom actually mentioned it to Paul. (Anna breaks down in renewed sobs). But, look, I'll help you if you like. I'm a bit of an expert on the phone. I'll give you some lessons. Anna: Oh thank you. Denise: Come in early tomorrow morning, before the others get here and we'll practise. Anna: Thank you Denise, that's very kind. Narrator: Wow! Denise is actually being nice to Anna. Amazing! Although from what I've heard of Denise on the phone, she's only ever gossiping with friends. Paul was very gentle and polite in the way he explained to Anna there was a problem and that she needed to improve some things. He used these phrases: I'm a little bit concerned about... You need to work on... Perhaps you should think about... Let's see if Denise manages to teach Anna anything useful next time. Until then!
Views: 52129 BBC Learning English
Learn to talk about learning a language in 6 minutes!
 
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Learn more here: http://bbc.in/1Bydv9W How can we make language learning simpler and faster? What challenges do we face? Rob and Neil discuss the ideas that could make it easier. [Images: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) We like receiving and reading your comments - please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 100994 BBC Learning English
Learn to talk about exercise in 6 minutes
 
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[Images: GETTY IMAGES] How many steps do you walk a day? Do you know the more the better for your health. Neil and Rob talk about the need to exercise and teach you some related vocabulary. This week's question: How many people aged between 40 and 60 do less than ten minutes brisk walking every month? Is it… a) 4%, b) 14% or c) 40%? Listen to the programme to find out the answer: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-171005 Vocabulary: vigorous using a lot of energy to do something saunter walk slowly brisk quick and energetic (the opposite of sauntering) build something in (to your day or your life) include it from the beginning incrementally gradually increasing in size sedentary (job or life) it involves a lot of sitting and not much exercise Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 114428 BBC Learning English
Learn to talk about giving up alcohol in 6 minutes
 
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[Images: GETTY IMAGES] After the excesses of Christmas, many people decide to give up booze for the month of January in the hope that it will do them some good. But what are the real benefits of going dry and is just one month long enough? Rob and Catherine discuss abstaining and sobriety and explain these words and several other drink-related vocabulary in just six minutes. Learn more here http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) We like receiving and reading your comments - please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 78817 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: 'Have to'
 
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Tim's back in his pronunciation workshop. This time he's finding out how English speakers pronounce 'have to' - and he's also finding out what time Londoners get up in the mornings. To get some more practice, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-11/session-5 Transcript: Tim Hi. I'm Tim and this is my Pronunciation workshop. Here I'm going to show you how English is really spoken. It'll help you to become a better listener and a more fluent speaker. Are you ready? Come on, follow me. Now, are you an early bird? Do you catch the worm? Do you even have the faintest idea what I’m talking about? Well, in English, an early bird is someone who gets up early in the morning. Now I hate waking up early, but because of my job sometimes I have to get up before 11 o'clock in the morning. I know - that's terrible, but I do it, just for you. Let’s find out about some other Londoners. Voxpops I have to get up in the morning at six a.m. I have to get up at half past six every morning. I have to get up in the morning at 6.45. I have to get up at 8 o'clock. I have to get up at 5 or 6 o'clock. Tim The word ‘have’ ends in the sound /v/, doesn’t it - or does it? Listen again: what sound can you actually hear? Also, pay attention to the pronunciation of the word ‘to’. Voxpops I have to get up in the morning at six a.m. I have to get up at half past six every morning. I have to get up in the morning at 6.45. I have to get up at 8 o'clock. I have to get up at 5 or 6 o'clock. Tim When we use the verb ‘have’ in its modal form: ‘have to’ meaning an obligation, the /v/ at the end of the word changes to an /f/. Also the vowel sound in the word ‘to’ changes to a schwa - /ə/. ‘Have to’ becomes /hæftə/. Here are some more examples. Examples They have to be there by 10. We have to find another flat. You have to tell me the gossip. I always have to take the train. Tim Right, so you’ve heard the examples, and now it’s your turn. Are you ready to start? Listen and repeat. Examples They have to be there by 10. We have to find another flat. You have to tell me the gossip. I always have to take the train. Tim Well done. Now remember, if you want to learn more about pronunciation, then please visit our website, bbclearningenglish dot com. And that is about it from the workshop for this week: I'll see you soon. Bye bye. Right, now as I got up at the crack of 11.00 in the morning, I’m exhausted – I have to grab 40 winks before the next shoot. Night night. Ah, that's good...
Views: 82618 BBC Learning English
Answering interview questions - 02 - English at Work helps.
 
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Anna's job interview continues. But with all the pressure and stress, she has frozen mid-sentence. This episode helps Anna and you find different ways to answer interview questions. For more: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/english-at-work
Views: 148197 BBC Learning English
Learn to talk about pedestrians in 6 minutes
 
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[Images: GETTY IMAGES] Norwich was the first city in the UK to ban cars from parts of the city centre. Planners wanted to protect pedestrians from cars and to reduce pollution in its old and narrow streets. – that was 50 years ago. There’s a fresh interest in keeping cars out of cities now for the same reasons. Rob and Neil talk about pedestrianising streets and teach you new vocabulary. This week's question: What’s the average speed of a bus travelling along Oxford Street? Is it: a) 4.6 miles per hour, b) 14.6 miles per hour or c) 46 miles per hour? Listen to the programme to find out the answer. Vocabulary: pedestrian a person who is walking, usually in an area where there’s traffic tackle (something) make an effort to deal with a difficult problem ban officially say that something can’t be done reroute change the direction you’re travelling in congestion too much traffic, making it difficult to move pollution damage to the environment caused by releasing waste substances such as carbon dioxide into the air, or plastic into the sea For more editions of 6 Minute English, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english
Views: 46485 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: Linking /w/
 
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Tim's back in his pronunciation workshop. This time he's looking at an aspect of connected speech called linking /w/. Find out what it is and how to use it - and why Tim needs an ambulance! For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-7/session-5 Transcript: Tim Hi, I'm Tim and this is my pronunciation workshop. Here, I'm gonna show you how English is really spoken. It'll help you become a better listener and a more fluent speaker. Come on, let's go inside. When we speak English fluently we sometimes add extra sounds in between the words to help them link together. Now, have a look at my feet. What's wrong with this? Let's ask the people of London: Voxpops The shoe is on the other foot. The shoe is on the wrong foot. The shoe is on the wrong foot. The shoe is on the wrong foot. Tim 'Shoe' ends in the sound /u:/ and 'is' begins with the sound /ɪ/. But can you hear another sound linking them together? Have another listen: Voxpops The shoe is on the other foot. The shoe is on the wrong foot. The shoe is on the wrong foot. The shoe is on the wrong foot. Tim When one word ends in an /u:/ sound and the next begins in a vowel sound we can just about hear another sound in between. This sound is a bit like /w/. So 'The shoe is…' becomes 'The shoewis'. This is called the linking /w/ - but it's important to remember that it's not a full /w/ sound. It happens because the mouth moves from an /u:/ sound to a vowel sound and on the way it passes through the /w/ mouth shape. Here are some more examples: Examples When do I have to be there? I haven't got a clue at all. That glue is really strong. I really can't do it. Tim So, you've heard the examples, and now it's your turn. Are you ready? Listen and repeat. Examples When do I have to be there? I haven't got a clue at all. That glue is really strong. I really can't do it. Tim Well done. Now remember, if you want to learn more about pronunciation, please visit our website, bbclearningenglish.com. And that's about it from the pronunciation workshop this week. See you soon. Bye. Now I really must get this other shoe on, otherwise I'm going to have an accident. Aaah! Too late.
Views: 77086 BBC Learning English
Step on it: The English We Speak
 
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Poor Rob! He's hurt his foot and Feifei's taking him to hospital but he uses an expression that leaves him in even more pain. Listen to the programme to find out about the phrase 'step on it' and how you should really use it. [Images: GETTY IMAGES] You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/the-english-we-speak/ep-180813 Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 28037 BBC Learning English
Polite questions: Stop Saying
 
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We have a question from Igor from Brazil, who wants to know how to ask questions more politely in English. Lucky for him, Helen has some tips on this very subject. http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/upper-intermediate/unit-4/session-4
Views: 32149 BBC Learning English
BBC News Review: Study into women's drinking habits
 
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A worldwide study into women's drinking habits has been carried out. Women now drink nearly as much alcohol as men. Join Neil and Sian to discover the language the world's media is using to talk about this story. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-17/session-2 The story A global study of drinking habits has shown that women have nearly caught up with men in terms of the amount of alcohol they consume. An analysis of four million people born between 1891 and 2001 found that women's drinking has increased due to a number of reasons, including falling prices and successful marketing. The study has concluded that public health efforts must focus more on women. Dr Tim Slade - The University of New South Wales, Australia Increased exposure to alcohol also increases the physical and mental health risks associated with drinking too much. And so that's something that we really need to continue to look at and do something about. Key words and phrases out-drinking drinking more than another person wine o'clock (humorous) an appropriate time of day to start drinking wine knocking back drinking something quickly or in large amounts, particularly alcohol boozer person who drinks a lot of alcohol
Views: 116255 BBC Learning English
Learn about cultural differences in 6 minutes
 
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If two people are talking lively and you don't understand their culture or their language, you might think they are having an argument. Neil and Tim talk about this kind of situation and teach you six items of vocabulary. This week's question: In which country does shaking your head mean ‘yes’, Tim? Is it… a) Greece, b) Japan or c) Bulgaria? Listen to the programme to find out the answer. Vocabulary no hard feelings is something you say to somebody you have argued with or beaten in a game or contest to say you’d still like to be friends to fall out with somebody to argue or disagree with them gesture a movement you make with your hands or head to express what you are thinking or feeling faux pas saying or doing something embarrassing in a social situation offend to make somebody angry or upset expressive showing what you think or feel [Images: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) We like receiving and reading your comments - please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 293840 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: The linking /j/
 
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Tim's back in his pronunciation workshop. This time he's finding out how happy the people of London are - and he's wondering where the little /j/ sound is coming from... For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-19/session-5 Transcript: Tim Hi. I'm Tim and this is my Pronunciation workshop. Here I'm going to show you how English is really spoken. Come on, let's go inside. Are you a creature of habit? For example, do you have a routine in the mornings? Every morning, I like to have a cup of tea and a chocolate biscuit. Mmmm. This is what some people in London told us when we asked them what they do in the mornings Voxpops I always have some breakfast. I always go to the gym in the morning. I always drink a glass of warm water when I wake up. Tim One thing that happens when we speak English fluently is that we sometimes add sounds between words to help link them together more smoothly and easily. Listen again. Can you hear another sound between the words I and always? Voxpops I always have some breakfast. I always go to the gym in the morning. I always drink a glass of warm water when I wake up. Tim Did you catch it? It’s hardly there but when one word ends in /aɪ/, /ɪː/, /eɪ/ or/ɔɪ/ sound, and the next word begins in a vowel sound, we can smooth the link out by adding a small /j/ sound. I always [slowly] becomes I always [fluently]. This is sometimes called the linking /j/. But be careful, your mouth normally does this naturally as your mouth changes shape between the sounds. You don’t actually want to add a full /j/ sound. Here are some more examples. Examples When I go on holiday I just want to lie on the beach. The end of the film was brilliant. I ate the whole cake in one go. It was too high up for me to reach. Tim Right, now you've heard the examples, and now it's your turn. You know the drill: listen and repeat. Examples When I go on holiday I just want to lie on the beach. The end of the film was brilliant. I ate the whole cake in one go. It was too high up for me to reach. Tim Well done. And remember, if you want to learn more about pronunciation, then please visit our website, bbclearningenglish.com. And that is about it from the pronunciation workshop for this week. I'll see you soon. Bye bye! Right, now I've been looking forward to this biscuit. Actually, do you want to see a magic trick? Now you see it, now you don't. What? It's a magic trick – magic trick!
Views: 45974 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: How fluent speakers pronounce plosives
 
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Tim's back in his pronunciation workshop. This time he's finding out about plosives in natural spoken English - and he's wondering which country he'd like to visit next... For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-17/session-5 Transcript Tim Hi. I'm Tim and this is my pronunciation workshop. Here I'm going to show you how English is really spoken. Come on, let's go inside. Wow. Isn't the world an amazing place? Look how many countries there are! Well – at least ten! Do you like travelling? How many countries have you visited? Now, is there any particular place, or country, that you'd like to visit? This is what the people of London told us when we asked them that same question. Voxpops I'd like to visit Iceland. I'd like to visit South America. I'd like to visit Spain and Greece. I'd love to go to Egypt. Tim The contraction 'I'd' ends in the sound /d/, doesn’t it? Or does it? Listen again - can you fully hear the /d/? Voxpops I'd like to visit Iceland. I'd like to visit South America. I'd like to visit Spain and Greece. I'd love to go to Egypt. Tim We make the sounds of English in different ways, using different parts of our mouths. There's a group of consonants called plosives, and if this sounds a bit like the word 'explosion', well, that's not a bad way of remembering it. Plosive sounds are made by suddenly releasing air that has been blocked by various parts of the mouth. The sound /d/ is one of these plosives. The others are /b/, /t/, /p/, /k/ and /g/. But in fluent, everyday speech, when one word ends in a plosive sound and the next begins in another consonant sound, we don’t always hear the release of the plosive sound. 'I'd like to', becomes 'Idliketuh'. This is called 'an unreleased stop', or, if you want to get really technical, 'a stop with no audible release'. Here are some more examples. Examples How about a quick chat? You should thank her. It was a sad time in his life. Why don't you sit down? Tim Right, so you've heard the examples, and now it's your turn. You know the drill by now: listen and repeat. Examples How about a quick chat? You should thank her. It was a sad time in his life. Why don't you sit down? Tim Well done. And remember, if you want to learn more about this, then please visit our website, bbclearningenglish.com. And that is about it from the pronunciation workshop for this week. I'll see you soon. Bye bye! Now, if you were to ask me where I'd like to visit next… well – anywhere! I just love travelling. Now let's see if we can find my next destination. Oww! I hurt my finger… again!
Views: 52562 BBC Learning English
Talk about marriage in 6 minutes!
 
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More here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-180405 6 Minute English: Year on year there are fewer opposite-sex couples getting married in the UK. So why might this be? Are we falling out of love with marriage? In this programme we hear from a couple of people with different views, and we take a look at some related vocabulary. Vocabulary trend direction that something is changing over time archaic dated or old-fashioned concept idea or belief commitment phobe someone who is scared of the idea of a long-term relationship because they believe they will have to give up some freedoms stabilising making something strong and secure inhibitions feelings of embarrassment that stop you doing certain things [Images: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 66545 BBC Learning English
Study Skills – How to think critically
 
04:18
You know how to find sources and include them in your assignments – but do you know how to evaluate their worth critically? This is key for success and will help you become a top-class distance learner. Find out how in this episode of our Study Skills series – part of our 'Go The Distance' course, giving you the skills and knowledge you need to be a top-class distance learner! For more information about academic know-how, English language and study skills for distance learners, visit us at http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/gothedistance. To find out more about our partner, The Open University, go to http://www.open.edu/openlearn/tv-radio-events/events/go-the-distance.
Views: 39956 BBC Learning English
Making a pitch – 13 – English at Work gets your pitch perfect
 
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Oh no! Anna's making a pitch to Mr Lime and his team at Citrus Ventures, but her presentation is not going to plan. Her computer has crashed and the presentation, along with her notes, has frozen. She's on her own now and all she can do is talk... but what can she say? This is where she really needs some skills to help her pitch the Imperial Lemon. To pitch something means to do a sales presentation. For more English at Work and other great content:: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/english-at-work TRANSCRIPT Narrator: Hello, welcome back to the offices of Citrus Ventures! (broken computer and murmur of people at meeting, as proceedings have been interrupted) Anna's presentation to Mr Lime and his colleagues continues... Well, almost! Her computer has jammed and the presentation, along with her notes, are frozen. Anna: Oh no, this is terrible! Narrator: Anna, you're going to have to manage without the slideshow or notes. Just talk! Anna: Just talk! Just talk! You just talk! What on earth am I going to say? My mind is blank. Narrator: Try to remember the key points you wanted to share, and give them one by one. If you can, give some facts that support each point. For example: Tip Top Trading is growing fast – our number of clients doubled last year. Use phrases like this: The company has a strong track record of... Let me share with you... The Imperial Lemon's key strengths are... Anna: OK. Ahem! (murmurs die down) Sorry about that, I'll just have to continue talking without the slideshow. So, ahem.... Tip Top Trading is growing fast – our number of clients doubled last year. This is because our company- Narrator: Yes, but try not to bark out information like a robot. Look people in the eye, slow down and try to be more conversational….oh, and smile! Anna: (more conversationally) Tip Top Trading is growing fast – our number of clients doubled last year. This is because our company has a strong track record of reliability and because, thanks to new technology, our fruits are more and more convincing. Our bananas have won awards for being the most authentic-looking fruits in Europe. We are very happy that Citrus Ventures is already among our clients and we hope to build on that by offering you more exciting new fruits. Let me share with you our latest product: (sound of unzipping of a bag) the Imperial Lemon. (impressed murmur from the audience) The Imperial Lemon's key strengths are its design and flexibility. It is made with revolutionary faux-orange-premium, laser-curve-definition technology... (fade out) Narrator: What an excellent performance from Anna. She focussed on some key points, supported them with facts and structured her answer clearly. She also managed to relax and sound more natural. She used these phrases: The company has a strong track record of... Let me share with you... The Imperial Lemon's key strengths are... Let's fast-forward to after the meeting to see if she gets an order. Anna: …so thank you for your time, I hope you're impressed with our Imperial Lemon. Mr Lime: Fantastic Anna, fantastic! Anna: Thank you. Mr Lime: Those... lemons – wow. I'd like to put in an order for three hundred thousand right away. Anna: Of course. Mr Lime: Now, what's your direct phone number? Narrator: Good work. Although, I must say, Mr Lime seems just as excited about Anna as he is about the lemons. Hmm....watch out Anna! Until next time!
Views: 55777 BBC Learning English
Diphthongs. Pronunciation Tips.
 
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Diphthongs and pronunciation. Learn English and improve your pronunciation with our series of 44 videos designed to help improve your pronunciation and English. This is a programme about diphthongs.
Views: 126113 BBC Learning English
Make polite requests - 05 - English at Work would like you to watch
 
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For more on making requests: http://bbc.in/29Nd9JK Can Anna use polite requests to help her in her new job at Tip-Top Trading? Anna is still getting used to how things work in her new job. She turns to her colleagues to ask for help, but upsets Denise by sounding too bossy. TRANSCRIPT Narrator: Welcome back to English at Work. We're still in Anna's first week in the busy offices of Tip Top Trading. How's it going Anna? Anna: Everything's still so new to me. I keep needing to ask people for help! Narrator: Well, that's only natural at the beginning. To ask people politely for help use the words would and could. You can also use the word please, but don't make the mistake of thinking's enough to make what you say polite. Anna: Er, ok. Paul: Hello Anna! Anna: Oh hi, Paul! Paul: I was wondering if you could do something for me? Anna: Yes of course. Paul: Would you be able to print out a file for me? It's a document on CBL – Convincing Bananas Limited – they're one of our suppliers. The file should be on the system and could I have it in the next ten minutes please, as they're on their way here for a meeting? Anna: Yes. Oh no, I've no idea how to find it! Tom...?! Tom: Er, ask Denise. She should know. Anna: Ok, thanks Tom, I'll ask her. Denise: (on the phone to Sharon) I'd warned her, you know, I said 'Victoria, if you don't change your hairdresser Anna: Denise? Denise: One day you'll… hold on a moment. Anna? Anna: Please email me the background file on CBL. Denise: Er! Anna: Thank you. Denise: (on the phone) Who does that girl think she is?... Anna... new girl... I told you about her... yes with the saucepans, that's the one. She's only been here five minutes and she's already acting like the Queen of Sheba... Anna: Oh and Denise, please send it to me within five minutes, Paul needs it soon. Thank you. Denise: Really! Tom: He he, good to see who's the boss, eh Denise? Denise: Really! Narrator: Er, Anna, I think you've upset Denise...? Anna: Upset Denise? Narrator: You were a bit rude when you asked her to help. Anna: Was I? Narrator: Remember what I said Anna. Just using ‘please’ to ask someone to do something can sound a little rude. Anna: Oh. Narrator: Instead of saying 'Please send me the file' you could say 'Could you possibly send me the file?' or 'Would you mind sending me the file?' Anna: Oh! English is so confusing! I'll try to remember that. Oh no, the printer isn't even set up! Tom? Tom: Yeah? Anna: Please help me with…I mean, could you possibly help me with the printer? Tom: Er... I need to finish this email to a really important new client. Anna: But it's really urgent. Would you mind writing your email later? Tom: Okay, since you asked so nicely. Let's have a look... Narrator: Well, it's a good thing Anna has understood how to use 'could' and 'would' to ask for things, before she upsets anyone else. Let's hear those phrases again: Paul: I was wondering if you could do something for me? Paul: Would you be able to print out a file for me? Paul: Could I have it within ten minutes please? Anna: Could you possibly help me with the printer? Anna: Would you mind writing your email later? Narrator: The printer seems to be working well, but how well are Anna and Denise working together? Are these two going to be enemies? Denise: Really! 'Denise do this! Denise do that!' I'm telling you Sharon, I've almost had enough! I get treated like I'm some kind of servant!
Views: 117470 BBC Learning English
Dating apps: How our brains react
 
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Rob and Dan discuss what our brains are doing when we are using dating apps. Listen to the discussion and learn new items of vocabulary in just 6 minutes! To download the audio and transcript, go to http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-180913 [Image: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 32159 BBC Learning English
BBC English Masterclass: Gerund or infinitive?
 
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Some verbs change meaning depending on whether they are followed by a gerund or infinitive verb. Learn about three of them – ‘stop’, ‘regret’ and ‘go on’ - in this Masterclass with Sian. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-9/session-1 Transcript: Sian Hi Sian here for BBC Learning English. Now lots of people stop to buy a coffee on their way into work, but not me - I've stopped buying coffee. What's the difference - 'stop buying' 'stop to buy'? You'll find out in this Masterclass. In English we have a group of verbs that can be followed by the gerund or the infinitive, but with a change in meaning. We're going to look at three of them: 'stop', 'regret' and 'go on'. 1) Stop 'I've stopped buying' 'I stopped to buy'? OK, number one, listen to these two examples with 'stop' and try and work out the difference in meaning. So, 'I've stopped buying coffee' and 'I stopped to buy a coffee this morning'. What's the difference? Well, the first example 'I've stopped buying coffee' 'stop' is followed by the gerund. This means the activity in the gerund form stops, so 'I've stopped buying coffee because it's so expensive. I'm drinking tea from now on.' In the second example, 'I stopped to buy a coffee this morning' the verb after 'stop' is in the infinitive, 'I stopped to buy a coffee' this means that we stop doing one action in order to do the action in the infinitive. So, this morning I stopped walking in order to buy a coffee. 2) Regret 'I regret telling you' 'We regret to tell you'? Number two; listen to these two examples with 'regret'. 'I regret telling you that' 'we regret to tell you that...' What's the difference? Ok, so the first example, 'I regret telling you that' 'regret' is followed by the gerund. This is when we feel sorry about something we've done in the past. So 'I regret telling you about that singing competition, now everybody knows I've entered!' The second example 'I regret to tell you that...' is followed by the infinitive. We use this when you're about to give bad news - when you're sorry for something you're going to say. So, 'We regret to tell you that your application has been unsuccessful'. This is normally quite formal and often in written English and normally with verbs like 'say', 'tell' or inform. 3) Go on 'She went on talking' 'She went on to talk' Ok, finally number three. What's the difference between these two examples with the verb 'go on'. 'She went on talking for hours' 'she went on to talk'? What's the difference? Ok, the first example 'she went on talking' we use the gerund because the action continues 'She went on talking for hours about gerunds and infinitives!' The second one 'she went on to talk' the verb is followed by the infinitive. This means the activity changes to another one. For example, 'she started talking about gerunds and infinitives and she went on to tell a joke.' That's all for now - Don't forget to visit our website. Ah now, there's another one - what's the difference between 'forget to do something' and 'forget doing something'? Visit our website BBClearningenglish.com to find out if you're correct. Goodbye!
Views: 75235 BBC Learning English
Learners' Questions: Using 'suppose' and 'supposed to'
 
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Sanmati from India says: People use 'suppose' and 'supposed to' a lot of the time in conversation. Can you please tell me in which sense and where they should be used? Dan has the answer. Watch the video and do the exercise here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/english-you-need/unit-27/session-5 Transcript Hi guys! Dan here for BBC Learning English with this week's Learner Question. Find out what it is after this. OK! This week's learner question comes from Sanmati from India, who writes: People use suppose and supposed to a lot of the time in conversation. Can you please tell me in which sense and where they should be used? Ok, Sanmati. Here we go. So, suppose can mean think, believe, imagine or expect, and in this sense, suppose is often used with negative structures when we hope the answer will be positive. For example: I don’t suppose you could lend me £20, could you? It is also used in short answers with the same meaning of think, believe, imagine, or expect, and note that two forms of the negative are possible. For example: Do you think he will be late? I suppose so. I suppose not. I don’t suppose so. Now, suppose and supposing can also be used in a completely different way to mean something like ‘what if’. And this is to introduce suggestions or to express fear. Now, note that the verb which follows suppose or supposing can be in the present tense or the past tense. So, for example: Suppose I come tomorrow instead of Friday, will that be ok? Or: Supposing I came tomorrow instead of Friday, would that be ok? We can also use the structure be supposed to plus the infinitive. And this means that something should be done because it is the law, the rule or the custom. However, in practice, it’s probably not done. For example: I’m supposed to clean my room before I go out, but I never do! Finally we can use the expression supposed to be to mean generally believed to be true by people. For example: This medicine’s supposed to be good for stomach cramps. Why don’t you try taking it? Finally, when you use supposed to in speech, note that the ‘d’ is not pronounced. It is pronounced suppose to. However, when you write it down, don’t forget the ‘d’, ok? I hope that answers your question Sanmati. Thank you very much for writing to us. If anybody else out there has a question for Learners’ Questions, you can email us on: [email protected] Please remember to put Learners’ Questions in the subject box and your name and where you’re writing from. We get a lot of emails, guys. I’m afraid we can’t answer every single one of them, but we do read them all. And for more information, go to our website bbclearningenglish.com. That’s it for this week’s Learners’ Questions. I’ll see you next time. Bye!
Views: 22218 BBC Learning English
Learn to talk about men's fashion in 6 minutes!
 
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For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-180329 6 Minute English discusses the trend for manbags. These designer accessories are being carried on the arms and shoulders of many modern men but they're not just for looking good, they're practical too. Find out who really is carrying one and learn some new vocabulary along the way. Vocabulary accessory an additional item added to something to make it more useful or attractive laughing stock someone who people think of as silly sturdy strong and not easily damaged masculinity characteristics that are traditionally thought to be typical of men hefty price tag high price inhibitions a feeling of embarrassment that stops you from doing something [Images: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 41924 BBC Learning English
Tea Idioms - BBC Learning English (The Teacher)
 
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The teacher introduces us to three idioms connected with tea.
Views: 150268 BBC Learning English
Learners' Questions: The difference between 'what' and 'which'
 
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'What' and 'which' - both are often possible. Often there is no difference. We can use 'which' for a limited choice. We can use 'what' for unlimited choice. Both can be determiners. Both can talk about people too. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/english-you-need/unit-2/session-5 Transcript Hi guys! Dan here for BBC Learning English with this week's Learner Question. Find out what it is after this. OK! This week's learner question comes from Cristina Gutiérrez. And she says: First of all, congratulations on your splendid programmes at BBCLearningEnglish -Thank you so much - They are both entertaining and useful - Good, that’s what we want them to be - I'd like to know what's the exact difference in usage between 'what' and 'which' at the beginning of direct questions. Well, Cristina, as you command, so we obey. Now both are often possible with very little difference. For example: ‘What or which is your favourite food?’ Or ‘Which or What is the best programme on TV at the moment?’ When we feel we have a limited number of choices, we prefer which. So with a menu: ‘Which dessert shall we have?’ Or when looking at a multiple choice test: ‘Which one is the answer?’ On the other hand, what is used when we feel we have an unlimited number of choices. So for example: ‘What shall we have for dinner?’ Or ‘What’s the answer to this question?’ Both can be used as determiners in direct questions when talking about people or things. They are always followed by nouns though. So: when looking at a line of cars I might say: ‘Which car is yours?’ But, in general, I might ask: ‘What car do you drive?’ In talking about people we can use which to ask about identity and what to ask about job. For example: There’s a group of people over there. Which is your friend? Or: ‘Tim’s a lawyer. What’s James?’ I hope that answers your question Cristina. Thank you very much for contacting us. If anybody else out there has a question about English they’d like answered, you can email us on: [email protected] Please remember to include Learners’ Questions in the subject line and your name and your country. You can also go to our website: bbclearningenglish.com. I’ve been Dan and I’ll see you next time on Learners’ Questions.
Views: 29171 BBC Learning English
Modals in the past: BBC English Class
 
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Rob must have eaten Dan's cake! Dan was looking forward to eating a piece of cake he'd brought into the BBC. But when he looked for it in the fridge, it was gone. He's sure Rob took it because he's done that before. How do you use modal verbs in the past to express that idea? Dan has a 90-second lesson to explain all. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/upper-intermediate/unit-25/session-1
Views: 27656 BBC Learning English
Talk about taking risks in 6 minutes!
 
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[Images: GETTY IMAGES] Rob and Neil discuss risk and how different people react to different levels of risk in different ways. See our webapge http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english Vocabulary: risk-averse describes people who don’t like risk risk-tolerant describes people who don't mind risk risk seekers describes people who like risk and want risk are to assess to make a judgement or a decision based on information to put money away to save money retirement time of life when you are too old to work anymore or you have enough money that you don’t need to work anymore. Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 48294 BBC Learning English

Pubg Hints Tips Guide Pubg Hints Secrets The Upside to Pubg Game Modes Pubg Game Modes Can Be Fun for Everyone When you launch the game for the very first time, you have to first pick a username before going into the character creator interface. If you prefer, you can host a customized game with a group of friends and make your own rules. Unfortunately, theres no game out there which exactly resembles GGO. Games unfortunately are a luxury and not a necessity, so they are most likely likely to be among the very first things to think about when deciding where you have to cut back on so far as your budget is concerned. Because it is a popular game. The British game is different than the majority of the others on the planet at the present time. If you believe there are different games like PUBG which are not on the list, and that we ought to cover, dont hesitate to set them in the comments below. 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